College Grads Say Salary Is Less Important than Facebook Freedom at Work

College Grads Say Salary Is Less Important than Facebook Freedom at Work

One in three college grads said that access to social media sites like Facebook and the ability to choose their own devices was more important to them than salary when considering a job offer. This according to a study of 2,800 college students and young professionals worldwide conducted by Cisco. More than 40% went so far as to say that they would accept less money for a job that was down with social media at work on a device of their choosing if it also included telework.

The study was intended to determine what the Millennium Generation wants from employers and what they consider to be an equitable work/life balance. Not surprisingly, they overwhelmingly wanted flexible work hours and remote access, with about one-third of college students saying that once they begin working, it will be their right – not a privilege – to be able to work remotely with a flexible schedule.

But the shocker was how strongly these young adults felt about limitations on their social media time.
  • Over half of college students globally (56%) said that if they were offered a job at a company that banned access to social media, they would either turn it down, or ignore it.
  • Two-thirds said they will ask about social media usage policies during job interviews.
  • 41% of those in the workforce said their companies convinced them to take the job by offering them flexible device choice and friendly social media policies when recruiting them.
  • At the same time, almost a third of the employees (31%) said their expertise with social media and devices actually helped land them the job -- employers believing that such know-how would give the company a competitive advantage.

One in three young workers say social media freedom is more important than pay. (source: Cisco Systems)

The demand for flexibility extends to device choice as well.
  • 81% want to choose the device for their job – either receiving funds to purchase the work device or bringing in a personal one in addition to standard company-issued devices.
  • More than three-quarters (77%) have multiple devices, such as a laptop and a smartphone or multiple phones and computers.
  • One-third (33%) use at least three devices for work.
  • 68% believe their companies should allow them to access social media and personal sites with their work-issued devices.
The next workforce clearly believes that work/life balance means that they are melded together, not separate-but-equal. With that view, work spills into social time and social time into work. Social tools also become work tools. While traditional employers may view Facebook or IM as fooling around on the job, social media sites may one day replace e-mail as the collaboration tool of choice for workers. Companies that ban them or view them as evil will not attract new talent, this study suggests, and could make themselves fall woefully behind.
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Anniebunny:
you are using comic sans. It's painful to read.

Comic Sans FTW!YesBig Smile

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Super Dave:
Anniebunny:
you are using comic sans. It's painful to read.
Comic Sans FTW!YesBig Smile

I've been using it here since April of 2009, and nobody has ever whined about it before.

It's like Rick Nelson sang,..."You can't please everyone, so you got to please yourself".

 

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Amen, Brother!

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i've been working in IT for going on 8 years now (I feel like i'm getting old) and my current job is a cubicle job.

I stay off of facebook, google+, twitter, etc. and I am still perfectly sane... mostly....

I occasionally browse the forums.

But if I need a break from my desk I just walk over to the next cube and shoot the ....stuff.... with my co-workers.

If you're hating your cubicle job or feel locked up in there, then the problem is likely that you don't work with people you can connect with. I love my cubicle :-) I have semi-privacy and work with awesome people.

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Wow...just wow. Is social networking that addictive? I mean, i have a Facebook, but holy cow. I feel like me and a few others are the only sane, hard working people in class. Everyone with a laptop, and I mean everyone, in my school surfs Facebook during class. It really pisses me off to no end. I'm studying to become a HS teacher, so I honestly can never be picky with my job. Even if I was in a different profession, I would never be picky with a job, unless I had requests out the wazoo. Also, believing its your "right" to work remotely is bananas. If you're heading into a job for an interview, you have no right to demand or assume anything about your privileges from said employer.

I swear, I'm growing up in a generation full of spoiled children. I'm in school right now, and I am working a full time job. Yeah, its at a Kmart, but its an income. There have been so many kids that come to work there that just stop showing up a week into work. Its infuriating to no end, and as time goes on, I honestly believe that all these wonderful advancements in medicine, technology, networking, transportation and everything else, is just being wasted on the shittiest generation of people.

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I've worked in both situations for multiple years. Honestly, I get more done with internet freedom and flex hours.

Why? Because a job where they monitored my internet usage, gave me lectures for coming in 5 minutes late or taking an extra 10 minutes at lunch - I was tied to a clock. Even with mandatory 10+ hour days, I was not focused on work. It didn't even matter if I didn't have work. I was tethered to my desk until that clock ran out. I was overjoyed when I was laid off.

Now I work flex hours and I have internet freedom. My job is not focused on hours, but the work for the day. If I'm here 8 hours or 15 hours to complete it doesn't matter, it's my responsibility to get it done and meet a deadline. My mind is not set on who might be watching what I'm doing right now, but the quality of what I have to show at the end of the day. We manage ourselves.

Keeping myself educated about the latest trends is a big part of my job too. I don't know what you use your social media for, but I end up reading articles like this mostly.

Just because jobs are scarce doesn't mean people should settle for less. Non traditional methods of work do work, even if you have never experienced them for yourself.

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humm I seem to make it through the day with out social media. I dont even use a computer at work (well kind of). 

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I agree with you

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I think all of these people interviewed were in Central Park during the Occupy Wall Street protests... lol

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I wonder how many people commented on this during work hours, on a work computer?

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APapadopulos:

I wonder how many people commented on this during work hours, on a work computer?

I'm guessing one, and that's only allegedly...

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This study isn't very transparent and could be very flawed. If someone asked me if i'd work for a company that bans social media, I have an immediate negative reaction towards that company and in a quick survey might saw no. It would be because that statement creates the image of a stickler company and a negative work environment, not because I can't get through the day without facebook. If someone also asked me "would you ask about social media usage in an interview " my immediate thought is "sure why not, don't want to get in trouble". In reality I would never ask that question in an interview. If these questions were part of a long survey subjects might not have thought more than a second about it. Just because students answered in a particular way to particular questions doesn't mean they are this pathetic... at least I hope they're not

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In defense of the students, If you asked me when I was 18 if I'd rather a job where I can check my email at work (pre-Myspace times), I would have said duh. It's like being allowed to make an occasional personal call from work back in the day. It is not until you leave school and become jaded by the job market that you realize you're lucky to make 30k anywhere doing any job, no matter the perks or freedoms you are given. This is a pretty harmless survey of kids who are still optimistic that you can devote 8 hours to a job and still get an occasional break to check in on your social networking account (which as another commenter pointed out, is replacing email rapidly).

Also, if you work for any company that is internet based, has a website, has clients, does marketing, consulting, advertising, or generally wants to make any money at all, it doesn't hurt to have employees that are active on social networking sites and actually appreciate their job and post about it online, put up work related links, etc. I see it all day amongst my peers and I'm a bit older (almost 30). It's 2011. This isn't really as crazy as some are making it out to be. The kids who said they'd turn down a job if they couldn't check facebook will not be doing that when the time comes, but that doesn't make it a crazy thing to want.

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It's an addiction like any other. Same as if you asked a heavy smoker if he would choose a job where he's allowed to smoke and another where he's not.

These kids were brought up with the media brainwashing, making them believe they need all those cell phones and social media to be accepted socially. I'm not saying it ain't useful and it could have its use in a workplace boosting productivity even. But for many people it would just waste their time and make them less productive. I've had a company once with over 10 employees and I once calculated I much money I lost in a week because many employees were wasting time talking and it racked up pretty fast. Now scale that up to a company with say 10,000 of them wasting say 1 hour a day each on facebook and lets pretend they're only making $10 an hour, well that makes $100,000 loss for that company everyday or  $36.5 million a year loss.

If this was your company would you be happy wasting all that money?

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