Camcorders, Not DVD Ripping: MPAA to Teachers

Camcorders, Not DVD Ripping: MPAA to Teachers

As you may know if you've been reading this site for a while, the U.S. Copyright Office is holding its triennial hearings on exemptions to the DMCA. One of the exemptions being sought would broaden one granted film and media professors in 2006 to rip DVDs (so they could use the clips in teaching) to other teachers as well.

Naturally, there's no way to directly record a DVD using a VCR; that particular loophole was closed when DVDs first came out. So ripping to use clips would seem the only solution, right? No, of course, not. The MPAA feels a better way to do this is to record DVD being played on a TV with a camcorder.

Of course! How simple (insert sarcasm here), and how lame. Of course, they promote this method because they don't want anyone ripping DVDs even if for a legitimate use. It might (gasp!) make people think there are legal uses for DVD ripping.

It's a good thing we weren't there; we might have burst out laughing. Watch the video:

MPAA shows how to videorecord a TV set from timothy vollmer on Vimeo.

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How do they sleep at night? Seriously...

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Lev_Astov:

How do they sleep at night? Seriously...

Let's hope they have Hellish nightmares.Devil

 

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They push this convoluted method because it's the only process that produces a degraded copy of the video.

They don't want you to know that you can just insert the CD in a Linux box and choose "Rip DVD with K3b" (or use one of a dozen other free programs) and get a perfect copy.

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I can see it now. A guy gets caught in a movie theater with a camcorder. And when the police are arresting him he's scaeaming the MPAA said I could, and shows them the clip on the MPAA website. :D

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^^ we will prolly see one or two cases or that.

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