Aperion's Home Audio Link Frees Your Music From Wired Headaches - HotHardware
Aperion's Home Audio Link Frees Your Music From Wired Headaches

Aperion's Home Audio Link Frees Your Music From Wired Headaches

Wireless audio is becoming a booming market; just a few years ago, no one thought twice about hooking up their music with all sorts of wires, and now it seems that using a wired solution has become second-rate. And for good reason. Wireless options are more abundant than ever before, and Aperion Audio is hoping that their latest kit is the wireless solution you've been waiting for.

The new Home Audio Link (or HAL, for short) is a wireless adapter that streams any audio format wirelessly from a computer, iPod, MP3 music player or mobile device to a variety of audio systems. It's really a universal wireless streaming solution, though you'll probably benefit most if you use some sort of USB-equipped netbook, notebook or desktop as your main jukebox. Users can even purchase additional HAL receivers in order to distribute audio without wires to up to three rooms.

The dongle can even be used in conjunction with a wireless powered subwoofer, and in order to hear music from a laptop computer, for example, the user simply plugs the matchbox sized HAL Send unit into a computer’s USB port, connects the HAL Receive unit into an AV receiver, plugs in the power adapter and the system links automatically. No Wi-Fi network is required for this to work, and no additional software has to be installed on anything. You're supposed to just plug this in and watch your tunes stream wirelessly, though we have to wonder if things really are so simple. The HAL system is priced at $149, with additional receivers priced at $79. They're available for pre-order now, and they should ship later this month in the United States.

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>> and no additional software has to be installed on anything.

_If_ you use the audio-in jack on it (on other side of unit, with audio-out on the receiver) to import the audio as an analog signal. Otherwise, it looks like it will act as a USB sound card, which is going to require drivers for older versions of Windows, and maybe not work at all with other OS's (analog-in would still work though).

The USB cable on the receiver threw me for a sec, but it looks like you connect it to an adapter and plug it into the wall. Or, if your audio equipment has a USB port - you could just plug it in there for power.

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Ahhh, I got it. This pic clears things up:

Notice the audio out. The product looks pretty flimsy in the pic as well. It basically acts like an extended audio cable really, without the wires. The USB adapter is there for power only I think.

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Yeah - I was just as confused. I went to their site and looked at the pics.

On the receiver, yes - the usb is only there for power (it plugs into a wall adapter).

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I'm confused. Shouldn't one of the USB connectors be an audio-in? I don't have any speakers that would work with a USB port.

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That's not where you connect it, there another audio port next to the USB where you connect an RCA splitter for audio in/out.

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Thanks, I read your first post immediately afterwards and figured it out.

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This is actually pretty cool you could cover a whole house as a sound system with nothing but speaker sources. I wonder how you manage the music. I am sure an open source plugin will be made for something like this, or at least I would hope so. Then you could have different files playing in different rooms. I think a quad core cpu could handle the traffic easily. I wonder about the hard drives though unless your just streaming web radio stations.

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The HAL allows you to link up 3 connections, enough for your home. I would be interested to know about the range for one of these though. You could even theoretically run the main jack from your ipod, as long as you had a USB powersource nearby.

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I was actually reading a review in CPU this month and the wireline network adapter's give a better network throughput and availability house wide for less and with higher throughput they are also easier to set up taking about half the time I don't know my N network is as secure as you can get using enterprise security but this is not wireless so no broadcasting at all more secure by default faster, cheaper and easier

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I am really thinking about changing my wireless to a power line setup as the connection is much more reliable everywhere and faster. I need to get to researching whats offered. maybe I will throw in some of these MM repeaters to.

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Also check out the Audioengine W1 (and the W2 for iPod/iPhone). The W1 transmits at a higher bitrate and is only $99 a set, which is great for daisy-chaining to all your gear around the house - think "poor-man's Sonos".

I use the W1 from my computer out to my living room stereo system and then another set from the living room into the dining room plugged into my Audioengine 5 powered speakers.

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