The Writers Are On Strike. Let's Watch YouTube

The entertainment industry is suffering from all sorts of downstream effects from the writer's strike. Companies from coffee shops in Los Angeles to payroll services are feeling the pinch, and some have gone under waiting for everyone to get back to work. But someone has benefited  from it: Online video sites.

The on-going writers' strike has meant that many popular programs are currently off-air in the US and, according to Nielsen Online, this has seen Americans turn in large numbers to online alternatives.

Its figures show that YouTube's audience was up 18% in the two months after the strike started, and newer video-sharing sites such as Crackle have also experienced unprecedented growth.

In September and October, Crackle enjoyed an audience of 1.2m users which doubled to 2.4m in November and December, it found.

"That is greater growth than you would normally see in such a short period and the strike could be a possible factor," said Nielsen analyst Alex Burmaster.

Increased access to high-speed digital connections is helping too. But demand for something to look at drives people to the web. That volume is encouraging more people to start online video websites. That's  having the effect of increasing the number of amateur video makers. You guys in Hollywood keep fighting over money. We'll make our own fun.


Tags:  YouTube, writer, watch, WAT, strike, AR, K
Via:  BBC News
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