For the First Time, "Password" is a Slightly Better Password than "123456"

To those of you who are using "password" to secure an account, you can rest slightly easier at night knowing that it longer tops the list of worst passwords. Two-time runner up "123456" has taken the dishonor of being the most common used password found on the Internet, giving the six-character combination the distinction of being the worst combination you can choose to lock down an account.

According to security firm SplashData, this is the first time "password" has lost its title as worst of the worst. It didn't fall far, however, sliding down a single spot to No. 2 on SplashData's list of the 25 worst passwords of 2013. Previously "123456" held the second spot.

Image Source: Flickr (ppclandingpages)

SplashData says its most recent list was influenced by the large number of passwords from Adobe users that were posted online as a result of a security breach.

"Seeing passwords like 'adobe123' and 'photoshop' on the list offers a good reminder not to base your password on the name of the website or application you are accessing," says Morgan Slain, CEO of SplashData. "Another interesting aspect of this year's list is that more short numerical passwords showed up even though websites are starting to enforce stronger password policies."

Here are the top 25 worst passwords:

  1. 123456
  2. password
  3. 12345678
  4. qwerty
  5. abc123
  6. 123456789
  7. 111111
  8. 12345467
  9. iloveyou
  10. adobe123
  11. 123123
  12. admin
  13. 1234567890
  14. letmein
  15. photoshop
  16. 1234
  17. monkey
  18. shadow
  19. sunshine
  20. 12345
  21. password1
  22. princess
  23. azerty
  24. trustno1
  25. 000000

SplashData compiled its list from files containing millions of stolen passwords posted online during the previous year. If you're using one of the above listed passwords and it's for an account you actually care about keeping secure, now would be a good time to change it.

Via:  SplashData
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