Dual-Core Itanium 2 Released

New Dual-Core Intel(R) Itanium(R) 2 Processor Doubles Performance, Reduces Power Consumption

Aggressive Growth in Itanium Hardware and Software Solutions Deliver Mission Critical Computing Freedom

SANTA CLARA, Calif., July 18, 2006 - Intel Corporation today unveiled five new products in the Dual-Core Intel(R) Itanium(R) 2 Processor 9000 series. Previously codenamed "Montecito," the new processors are designed for the most sophisticated high-end computing platforms in the world. They double the performance and lower energy requirements, improving performance per watt by 2.5 times compared to existing, single-core versions. All server-maker members of the Itanium Solutions Alliance (ISA) will launch new Dual-Core Intel Itanium 2 Processor 9000 series-based products.

The flagship 9050 model features two complete processing cores and nearly triples the cache or memory reservoir versus Intel's previous generation. It also can execute four instructions or threads per processor enhanced by Intel's Hyper-Threading Technology (HT Technology).

The new Dual-Core Itanium 2 processors represent the world's most intricate product design to date with more than 1.7 billion transistors. This allows Intel designers to deliver new features to the Itanium processor family that create robust virtualization capabilities, enhanced cache reliability and other mainframe-like capabilities.

Unlike products from the remaining RISC vendors, the Dual-Core Intel Itanium 2 Processor 9000 series offers end-user freedom through a broad choice of software with more than 8,000 applications in production. Itanium processor-based servers and high-performance computing (HPC) systems are unique in the industry. They provide mission critical support for Windows*, Linux*, UNIX* and other operating systems as well as new migration tools off of proprietary servers and mainframes - delivering unbeatable flexibility and a confident adoption path for IT managers to migrate to a standards-based architecture.

Full press release here.

Via:  Intel
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