Crazy Lawsuit Seeks to Cancel Chromebook Launch

In just two short days (June 15, 2011), Acer and Samsung will launch the long awaited Chromebook based on Google's Chrome OS software, which potential buyers will be able to purchase from Amazon.com and Best Buy. Or at least that's how the script is supposed to go. Trying to throw a cog in the wheel is ISYS Technologies and subsidiary Xi3 Corporation, who filed a lawsuit against Google alleging that the search giant is infringing the trademark for its ChromimumPC Modular Computer.


The suit not only wants all companies involved to stop marketing the Chromebook and Chromebox PC products, but also seeks an expedited temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction against Google and its partners that would delay the launch.

"As I noted in the May 20 ChromiumPC news release, 'The Xi3 Computer Architecture is designed to support any x86-based operating system, including Windows, Linux, Unix, and other open source-based operating systems,'" said Jason A. Sullivan, president and CEO of ISYS Technologies. "This is also true of the ChromiumPC Modular Computer, which is capable of running open source operating systems and browsers, but will not ship pre-loaded with a Google licensed OS.

"We do not begrudge anyone the ability to create new products and take them to market, unless they infringe on our intellectual property. For more than 18 months, we’ve been using, marketing, promoting and selling ChromiumPC Modular Computers. But in spite of our sincere efforts to resolve this matter amicably with Google, we’ve clearly reached an impasse. So for now, we feel we have no other choice than to request the assistance of the court to protect us in this very critical matter regarding ChromiumPC."

What makes this suit even more interesting is that just last month, Xi3 Corporation announced in a blog post that its ChromiumPC computer would be the "world's first desktop computer designed to run Google's Chrome operating system," and now the company is saying it won't ship pre-loaded with a Google licensed OS.

Google hasn't commented on the lawsuit.


Via:  BusinessWire

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