Items tagged with Privacy

The Internet is littered with memes describing awkward moments and perhaps now someone will make a new one describing that awkward moment when a service that prides itself on anonymity mistakenly shares your email address without thousands of others. So it goes with Glassdoor, an online portal where employees past and present can leave anonymous reviews of companies.Glassdoor is a popular and handy website for any job seeker considering employment at a particular firm. It's filled with useful information, a lot of it anecdotal in terms of being user reviews, but also what kind of compensation to... Read more...
Law enforcement officials are seeking help from a professor at Michigan State University with creating a special 3D printed replica of a homicide victim's fingers in order to unlock his phone using his fingerprints. In theory it sounds like a brilliant idea, one that would sidestep the potentially contentious process of trying to get Apple or Google to assist with unlocking the device, only there's a pretty major roadblock that stands in the way. There are safeguards in place that require a passcode if a fingerprint scanner hasn't been used in quite some time. For example, as of iOS 9, Apple added... Read more...
We reported earlier on France's demands to Microsoft with regards to bolstering its Windows 10 OS to better protect user data, and ultimately, their privacy. The fact that a watchdog would target Microsoft for collecting too much data probably strikes no one as a surprise, as that very complaint has been one shared by many users since the launch of Microsoft's latest OS. In the complaint, France's Chair of the National Data Protection Commission noted a couple of big issues, from the fact that the PIN code can be entered as many times as an attacker needs it to be and also that certain mechanisms... Read more...
France's data privacy and protection watchdog has ordered Microsoft to put the brakes on what it deems is excessive user data collection in Windows 10. It also took issue with certain elements of Windows 10 that need to be more secure, such as entering the four-character PIN to log into the operating system, and privacy breaches stemming from the browser. The Chair of the National Data Protection Commission (CNIL) notified Microsoft of its decision following an investigation by a special contact group created by various authorities in the European Union. CNIL says the investigation "revealed many... Read more...
It seems impossible for the world to go a single week without a major security breach, so to fill the inevitable void this week is a hacker that goes by the name "thedarkoverlord," who claims to be in possession of a staggering 655,000 healthcare records. Of course, he is looking to sell them off. This latest records leak was first reported by Deep Dot Web, which has exclusive images to prove that the leak is real (one can be seen below). These images were not sourced by the website; rather, thedarkoverlord himself provided the images, probably as a way to build up some notoriety, and to flaunt... Read more...
Every so often, Facebook does something that sets off the alarm of privacy advocates—perhaps it's inevitable when you're the largest social network on the planet with over 1.65 billion users. Right now that something is tapping into your smartphone's location data to suggest friends based on where you're at or where you've been. Why is this unsettling? Getting past the theoretical situations and jumping straight into a real-world example that's a bit creepy on Facebook's part, Kashmir Hill at Fusion writes an anecdotal account of a man on Facebook who suspected it had tracked his location to figure... Read more...
Apple Inc. announced at last week’s developer conference that it will start collecting user data with iOS 10. The company wants to make Siri and iPhones better at predicting and suggesting information a user may need, but this will strictly be an opt-in feature. The company stated that it will use “differential privacy” in order to collect the necessary data. Differential privacy is a concept that aims to make queries more accurate in statistical databases while still maintaining the privacy of those who provide the data. In order to maintain user’s privacy, Apple will inject a small amount... Read more...
You know a story is going to be good when it involves Facebook, its creator Mark Zuckerberg, and the word "privacy". It used to be that Google was considered the biggest, baddest people data-fetcher, but over time, that crown has been passed to Facebook, a service that doesn't even need to try to get information from people, as those people willingly cough it up themselves. For a multitude of reasons, the lack of privacy on Facebook should be concerning to many, especially when you consider that Mark Zuckerberg can't seem to get enough privacy for himself. As we reported just the other day, Facebook-owned... Read more...
It's been said time and again that if you're not paying for something, then you're the product. That's an oversimplification of how things work, but there's also some truth to the statement, especially in the social media world where services like Twitter and Facebook are free to use. Be that as it may, Facebook insists that it hasn't crossed the line by tapping into people's microphones to deliver targeted ads. "Facebook does not use your phone’s microphone to inform ads or to change what you see in News Feed. Some recent articles have suggested that we must be listening to people’s conversations... Read more...
Two years ago Mark Zuckerberg and the gang introduced an advertising platform called Facebook Audience Network. It was designed to help publishers and developers support their services through targeted ads, which are ads that are determined to be relevant and of interest to the person viewing them. Up until now the Facebook Audience Network was used only to show ads to people with Facebook accounts who visit specific websites and apps, but now they'll follow you across the web. The Facebook Audience Network is also expanding to include those who don't use or aren't connected to Facebook. Through... Read more...
We don't need to tell you that Apple has been dealing with some extreme issues revolving around encryption in recent months. Most of the hassle was spurred back in December when the FBI wanted the Cupertino company to help break into a terrorist's iPhone 5c, something it refused to do. As time went on, the FBI figured out its own solution to getting in, much to Apple's chagrin. Since then, government agencies have made use of this newfound power to gain access to consumer iPhones, and that has guaranteed just one thing: hardware vendors are going to push even harder to make sure this isn't possible... Read more...
John McAfee, the antivirus pioneer who created the self-titled AV software that was eventually sold to Intel for $7.68 billion, tried shopping a story to the media that he and his merry band of hackers thwarted WhatsApp's encryption because of a major flaw in Android. The only problem is it didn't exactly happen that way.WhatsApp is an interesting target because it recently announced the addition of end-to-end encryption. It's also the most used messaging application in the world with over a billion users, so if there's a flaw in Android, the most popular mobile OS on the planet, that compromises... Read more...
The rise of the Internet has forever changed the way we go about our daily lives and made certain things more convenient, but the more online services a person uses, the higher the potential privacy cost. That's been a rising deterrent for Americans, many of which now avoid certain online activities over concerns about privacy and security, according to a recent study by the National Telecommunications & Information Administration. NTIA combed over survey data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau, which included answers to several privacy and security questions by more than 41,000 households... Read more...
Researchers at Aarhus University in Denmark caused quite the online kerfuffle when they posted personal information of nearly 70,000 users registered at OkCupid, a popular online dating website. The data dump contained usernames, ages, gender, religion, personality traits, and answers to questions designed to help the site find matches for singles. Lead author Emil Kirkegaard and his research partner Julius Daugbjerg Bjerrekaer zeroed in on OkCupid "because users often answer hundreds of not thousands of questions," making it a rich and readily available source of survey data. The information obtained... Read more...
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