Items tagged with Privacy

There's a lot to love about Windows 10, but as it happens, there are a bunch of caveats to be aware of, as well. In fact, as soon as the OS released last week, security experts the world over began to raise a stink about how this is the OS that basically throws away your privacy, and in some cases, even your control. One example of the lack of control relates to Windows Update, something we've covered multiple times in the past. In effect, even those using the Pro version of the OS have less control over how updates are handled versus previous versions, and while an add-on tool has been released... Read more...
There are few things quite as frustrating as dealing with a loss of power. In many cases, that wouldn't cut off communication entirely, as most of us have cell service that would allow us to keep in contact. But what about in the case of a full city power outage? It's happened, and it makes the loss of power at your own home seem like a cakewalk. In extreme cases, it could be governments that are causing disruption, with a notable case being Hong Kong last year, during the Umbrella Revolution. As this was going on, people were unable to make use of their mobile service to keep in contact with each... Read more...
Google has just rolled-out yet another cool feature to one of its products that's both awesome and downright scary from a privacy standpoint. This time, it's Google Maps that's affected, and its new feature "Your Timeline" leaves little to the imagination. With it, you'll be able to effectively stalk yourself - in the past! As it is today, Google by default tracks where you are at any given time, but the amount of information captured is minimal. If you took a trip to New York six months ago, you'll probably be able to see that referenced in your Maps history. Your Timeline takes things further... Read more...
Be careful what you post in jest on social networking sites like Twitter, Facebook, and even YouTube, lest the U.S. government labels you as a potential terrorist threat. It's the online world we live in these days, and in an effort to thwart the bad guys (and gals) before they can do harm, a new bill would encourage social media sites to notify federal authorities of online "terrorist activity."According to Reuters, which claims to have seen a text of the bill that was approved by the Senate Intelligence Committee, social media sites would have the green light to tattle on posts that talk about... Read more...
The developers behind the uber-popular Plex media center software have revealed that their databases have been breached, and of course, that means just one thing: you might have a password or two to change. In an email sent to affected users, Plex developers note that only its forum and blog were compromised, and that no financial information is at risk, as that's located on external servers. That doesn't mean that this should be taken too lightly, though, as those who managed to break into the server got away with IP addresses, email addresses, encrypted (hashed + salted) passwords, and perhaps... Read more...
Maybe someday the Chinese government will take a page from O.J. Simpson and write a book titled, "If I Did It: Confessions of a Hacker." After all, China is clinging to the innocence card just as adamantly as Simpson, never mind any evidence to the contrary. In fact, not only is the Chinese government saying it's not responsible for a massive security breach that compromised the personal information of millions of U.S. federal employees, but it claims that the accusations are the result of "absurd logic."The security breach was discovered in April, but actually began back in December of last year.... Read more...
A potential trial between Royal Mail, the postal service company in the United Kingdom, and what's being described as a "big retailer" underscores why it's important to take online privacy seriously. Should the two sides move forward with the trial, online users living in the U.K. will receive market materials via snail mail based on their online shopping habits. Let's say a shopper named Joe visits this so-called big retailer and adds an item to his virtual shopping cart. If Joe doesn't complete the transaction for any reason, he would receive a physical letter or product pamphlet in the mail... Read more...
If the state of the US government's security wasn't appalling before, it sure should be now. Earlier this month, we reported on a breach of government systems that saw the information of four million current and prior government employees get taken by a third-party -- a third-party that was highly believed to be China. Well, now it seems certain. As we learned before, that breach was discovered in April, but we now know that it began in December. That means that the attackers -- the Chinese -- had a free-for-all with this personal data for four months. According to... Read more...
If you didn't know what HTTPS was two-years-ago, chances are you're familiar with it now. Ever since Edward Snowden blew the whistle on NSA spying, the world has gradually been improving its efforts to to protect its data - either at the user or government level. Last fall, Google said that it was going to begin preferring websites that use HTTPS, and if there was any doubt that HTTPS was important, even the US government has made it clear that its own websites need to have secure connections across the board. It looks like social site reddit is... Read more...
Microsoft this week announced that web searches made using the company's Bing search engine will soon be encrypted by default. In actuality, users have been able to encrypt searches made via Bing for around a year and a half now, though sometime before summer comes to an end, it will be a standard option for all users. The move will level the playing field with Google and Yahoo, both of which already offer encrypted searches by default. Of course, the bodies at Microsoft still need to eat and so the company will conintue to pass along referrer strings to marketers and webmasters that identify traffic... Read more...
It's been a full two years since Edward Snowden blew the whistle on the massive spying efforts of the NSA, and despite the sheer amount of information and revelations that have come out since then, there still seems to be a lot more to come. The latest reveal involves the NSA running an intrusion detection system on the Internet's backbone, something it was granted permission for behind-the-scenes. It's reported that in 2012, the Justice Department wrote secret memos to grant the agency the ability to monitor addresses that exhibited security risk behavior. It's important to note that this permission... Read more...
Edward Snowden, a former contractor for the National Security Agency who leaked confidential documents and information to the press regarding the U.S. government's PRISM program, says he has never been "so wrong," and for that he's "grateful." Let's add some context, shall we? Snowden says he was wrong to worry that his efforts and the risk he and the journalists who broke the story over the NSA's bulk collection of phone records would have been for nothing, "that the public would react with indifference, or practiced cynicism, to the revelations." "Never have I been so grateful... Read more...
Apple chief Tim Cook came out swinging during EPIC's Champions of Freedom event in Washington where he was being honored for corporate leadership. His remotely beamed acceptance speech talked about privacy and security, and without calling out other big tech firms by name, he took shots at companies and competitors like Facebook and Google. "I’m speaking to you from Silicon Valley, where some of the most prominent and successful companies have built their businesses by lulling their customers into complacency about their personal information," said Cook. "They’re gobbling up everything they can... Read more...
Senator Rand Paul, a presidential hopeful for the Republican party, was ultimately successful in his ongoing effort to prevent the U.S. Senate from voting on extensions to key provisions of the Patriot Act. As a result, the National Security Agency's legal authority to collect telephone records in bulk expired at the stroke of midnight Monday."Tonight we stopped the illegal NSA bulk data collection. This is a victory no matter how you look at it," Rand said in a statement. "It might be short lived, but I hope that it provides a road for a robust debate, which will strengthen our intelligence community,... Read more...
1 2 3 4 5 Next ... Last