Items tagged with PC gaming

Whoever the Einstein was that declared this a "post PC era" needs talk to the gamers and enthusiasts that flocked to Boston Convention And Exhibition Center this weekend for the sold-out PAX East show. And in good ol' Bean Town, the Murphys might dropkick that genius for being overly impaired and "ship him off" promptly. In a record attendance of around 90,000 or so, there was plenty of console gaming going on, as well as mobile gaming on tablets and smartphones, and even board games but nothing compared to the crowds flocking around booths from major PC manufacturers and ecosystem partners like... Read more...
Face the facts: if you want a pre-built PC that can play virtually any game at high resolutions with high-quality settings, you're going to have to pay a princely sum. While you could probably build your own PC for less than a pre-built system, boutique builders typically offer a number of benefits in the form of guaranteed overclocks or custom component. Or maybe you just have no interest whatsoever spending all that time installing parts and hiding cables in your case. Though Digital Storm's Bolt 3 isn't the highest-end gaming PC we've tested, it holds its own for its not-so-insignificant price—delivering... Read more...
Mad Catz is gearing up to release a new model in its R.A.T. series of wildly customizable gaming mice. The company’s mice are often pricey, and that’s certainly true of the R.A.T. Pro X, which will run you nearly $200, but the upcoming R.A.T. Pro S is on preorder for a much more reasonable $69.99. Both models look like no other mice in the industry and are pretty well guaranteed to get some attention at the next LAN party you attend. Mat Catz R.A.T. Pro SBut as eye-catching as they are, Mad Catz mice are best known for being customizable. Swappable parts, adjustable palm rests, built-in profile... Read more...
The last time we looked at Dell's Alienware X51 series of console-sized gaming PCs was back in mid-2013. Back then we were working with Intel's 4th generation Haswell Core Series processors and NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 600 series GPUs based on their Kepler graphics core. Our man Paul, frankly, was spouting off a bit wildly about aliens serving humans for dinner and, well, let's just say it made for interesting reading. But that was so 2013, and like anything in life, seasons change and architectures evolve. Paul is still nuttier than a fruit cake but that's a different story all together, so we'll... Read more...
I'm about to make some enemies, but I firmly believe console-sized gaming PCs like the Alienware X51 and Falcon Northwest Tiki are poised to assimilate their behemoth desktop competitors, zap them with shrink rays, and usher in powerful 4K gaming in diminutive mini-ITX packages. We're not quite there, but today Alienware has abducted the former incarnation of its X51 PC and replaced it with a revised system that represents one confident leap in that direction. When last the Alienware X51 descended upon HotHardware, it was clearly designed to take on game consoles like the Xbox 360, right... Read more...
We use a bevy of benchmarks here at HotHardware to measure everything from computational power to SSD speeds to the graphical prowess of $1000 video cards. I employ 3DMark's Fire Strike software on a near-daily basis for my GPU testing and find that, while it can't perfectly mirror in-game performance, it's a pretty accurate representation of a graphics card's -- and by extension your PC's -- gaming chops. But as we collectively rush toward the proliferation of Virtual Reality hardware and games in 2016 and beyond, we lack a standard for testing how well our systems can handle VR. Enter Crytek... Read more...
Love the tactile nature and accuracy of mechanical keyboards for PC gaming, but prefer to ditch the noise associated with them? Need an MMO mouse that accommodates your fat thumbs? Perhaps a new headset that thoughtfully uses LEDs on its microphone to indicate the status of various sound settings? If you answered yes to any of the previous questions, Corsair just unleashed some new weapons in their gaming arsenal that might fit the bill, including the STRAFE RGB Silent -- the world's first keyboard to incorporate Cherry MX Silent gaming switches. Into the VOID "One of the biggest complaints... Read more...
In what must be considered one of the most obvious, inherently logical, and overdue moves in open world gameplay, the Internet, technology, commerce, business, marketing, etc., LEGO has launched LEGO Worlds, the company's entry into the sandbox gaming space.   Available through Valve's PC gaming Stream platform (Windows only, at this stage), LEGO Worlds players can procedurally generate their own landscapes using LEGO bricks that can be freely manipulated (virtual ones, of course), and they can dynamically populate their worlds with LEGO models based on real-world LEGO play sets... Read more...
Ahhh, the 90s! Jean shorts, Big Johnson t-shirts, fanny packs, and of course, MS-DOS gaming. I can remember spending hours playing games like Crusader: No Remorse, Wolfenstein 3D, Duke Nukem 3D, Road and Track Presents: Need for Speed, and yes even the original Worms (usually in my high school drafting class when I finished my Autocrat R12 assignments ahead of schedule). The Internet Archive, which is probably best known for its Wayback Machine, puts a lot of effort into collecting all sorts of media (books, movies, software, images, etc.) and makes them free for the public to view. But for those... Read more...
Over the past few weeks, I've spent a significant amount of time with Watch Dogs. The game is infamous for not running very well on PCs -- and after some legwork, I've figured out a hefty chunk of the reason why:  Ubisoft royally screwed up its suggested VRAM (graphics card frame buffer) settings. Watch Dogs sucks down far more memory than any other modern PC game I'm aware of; this game's VRAM demands are far, far outside the norm for a modern 1080p title. In the past, I've compared VRAM usage in games like Guild Wars, Battlefield 4, and Total War: Shogun 2.  In these games, the average... Read more...
If you’ve been bashing bad guy heads in the moody Batman: Arkham Asylum and Batman: Arkham City epics, it’s time to take a step back – in time, that is. The newest Batman video game takes you back to the events and people who come to shape the city Batman defends, and Batman himself. As you can imagine, there is a lot more action when Batman faces a test of his character than when you spot a dropped wallet at the grocery store. Batman will be facing off with young, evil types, including the Penquin and (of course) the Joker, thanks to a bounty on his head. And you’ll be... Read more...
Some people would have you believe that PC gaming is all but dead, nothing more than a decrepit reminder of the early days of videogames, and one that's on life support as publishers and developers switch their focus to dedicated consoles and mobile platforms. They are, of course, dead wrong. So wrong, in fact, that Jon Peddie Research (JPR) saw fit to announce that the PC gaming hardware market is on pace to hit $23.6 billion in 2012, which is hardly the sign of a dying sector. "We are witnessing the market morph and grow into different areas. This has always been a strong point of PC gaming;... Read more...
Ubisoft is one of the largest video game publishing companies in the world, but when it comes to DRM (Digital Rights Management), the corporate executives at the helm have the collective intelligence of a ham sandwich. In years' past, the publisher was criticized for its use of StarForce copy protection, the PC port of Assassin's Creed tried to phone home every 75 seconds (causing the game to lag and stutter), and an official patch for Rainbow Six Vegas 2 broke the game for anyone who had purchased it online. Ubisoft's solution was to grab a previously issued CD-crack from a warez group and distribute... Read more...
WORLDWIDE TECHNOLOGY LEADERS LAUNCH INDUSTRY CONSORTIUM TO ADVANCE PC GAMING PLATFORM, PC GAMING EXPERIENCESUnited industry effort will accelerate innovation, spur PC gaming developmentGlobal leaders of the PC gaming industry announced today the formation of the PC Gaming Alliance, a non-profit organization that unites hardware and software creators, game developers and publishers, and others committed to the PC gaming market with the common purpose of advancing the PC as a worldwide gaming platform. Together, PCGA and its member companies will work to accelerate innovation, improve the gaming... Read more...
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