Items tagged with Flash

Little by little, the web is transitioning to a Flash-free experience. HTML5 has emerged as the popular replacement for Flash content, though there are still scores of web ads out there that still use Adobe's Flash Player. That's about to change—at the end of June, Google will no longer accept new Flash-based ads on its ad networks."Starting June 30, 2016, display ads built in Flash can no longer be uploaded in into AdWords and DoubleClick Digital Marketeing," Google's AdWords division stated in a Google+ post. "Starting January 2nd, 2017, display ads in the Flash format can no longer run on the... Read more...
2015 has proven to be a massive year for Adobe's Flash plugin, but for all the wrong reasons. Flash is already infamous for being one of the most vulnerable pieces of software on the planet, but in 2015, 316 bugs were found and squashed. That comes out to about 6 bugs per week for a piece of software that's used by the vast majority of notebook and desktop users. What's most impressive about the sheer number of bugs Flash has is the fact that ultimately, we're dealing with a mere plugin here, not a massive software package. While Flash was once considered "cool", a de facto choice for Web animation,... Read more...
As if Adobe's Flash Player needed another nail in its coffin, it nevertheless received yet another one this weekend from Facebook. The world's largest social playground announced that it recently flipped the switch over to HTML5 to be the default video player for videos on its website, and that includes the ones that appear in its News Feed. "From development velocity to accessibility features, HTML5 offers a lot of benefits. Moving to HTML5 best enables us to continue to innovate quickly and at scale, given Facebook’s large size and complex needs," Facebook stated in a blog post. You could see... Read more...
We’ve been saying it for years: Adobe needs to go ahead and kill Flash. Late Apple CEO Steve Jobs called for Flash’s demise five years ago and at the time, it seemed like an impossibility. But after a half decade of increasing security exploits and performance degradation in even the most powerful PCs, the Internet has quite effectively turned its back on Flash. Companies like Amazon, Google and Firefox have all given Flash the cold shoulder in recent months and the lapses in security show no signs of slowing down. Adobe has finally gotten the hint and is retiring the Flash brand. “Flash has played... Read more...
At this point, we are no longer surprised that Adobe Flash is being used as an easy vector to exploit computers and entire network. Back in the day, late Apple CEO Steve Jobs trashed Adobe Flash, calling it buggy, full of security holes and detrimental to the battery life of mobile devices. Five years later, Flash is still with us and it is still wreaking havoc on all three of those fronts.  The latest Flash vulnerability was revealed this week, and it affects ALL version of the software — yes, even version 19.0.0.207, which was released on Tuesday. The exploit, which is labeled CVE-2015-7645,... Read more...
The security gurus at Trend Micro believe that the cyber attackers behind Pawn Storm are performing their dirty deeds by way of a new zero-day vulnerability in none other than Adobe's Flash platform. Shocking that Flash is at the root of it all, isn't it? This is where we all feign surprise, sarcastically of course.In case you're not familiar, Pawn Storm is the name of a cyber espionage campaign that's had high profile targets in its sights. Trend Micro also says that Pawn Storm represents the first use of a Java zero-day that it's seen in the last couple of years, with the affected vulnerability... Read more...
Today, Intel is taking the wraps off new NVMe PCI Express Solid State Drives, which are the first products with these high speed interfaces that the company has launched specifically for the enthusiast computing and workstation crowds. Historically, Intel's PCI Express-based offerings, like the SSD DC P3700 Series, have been squarely targeted for datacenter or enterprise applications, with price tags to match. However, today Intel is throwing performance enthusiasts another bone with the launch of the Intel SSD 750 series. We've historically been big on PCI Express SSDs here, because they get around... Read more...
Can I get an “Amen” from the congregation? The planets are aligning and it appears that more heavy-hitters are throwing support behind taking down one the Internet’s greatest villains: Adobe Flash. Back in June, we brought you news that Google would be introducing a new “Intelligent Pause” function to Chrome that would disable all Flash content by default (or give Chrome the option to choose what Flash content is deemed worthy). If for some reason you actually need to access a blocked Flash element on a site, you will have the option to click on the element to re-enable it. Google favors HTML5... Read more...
Amazon is the latest major tech company to kick Adobe's Flash platform to the curb. Effective September 1, 2015, the world's most popular online retailer will no longer accept Flash-based advertisements on its main site or through it's third-party Amazon Advertising Platform (AAP), the company announced this week. Interestingly, it's not Flash's history of security woes that prompted Amazon's decision. "This is driven by recent browser setting updates from Google Chrome, and existing browser settings from Mozilla Firefox and Apple Safari, that limits Flash content displayed on web pages," Amazon... Read more...
Adobe's Flash platform is running out of friends. You may recall that a few weeks ago Mozilla disabled Flash by default in its Firefox browser due to the discovery of multiple critical vulnerabilities, and around the same time, Facebook's chief security officer urged Adobe to set a kill date for its buggy API. Expect more of those sentiments following a recent week long attack on Yahoo's ad network. Security outfit Malwarebytes discovered the "malvertising" campaign, which kicked off on July 28. It involved hackers purchasing ads across Yahoo's various sites and then injecting them with malicious... Read more...
In the wake of recent security threats that have come to light, Mozilla has made the decision to block Adobe Flash content by default on all versions of its Firefox browser. Mark Schmidt, head of Firefox support at Mozilla and CEO of SupportHacker, announced the change via Twitter on Monday, adding that this is a temporary thing. "BIG NEWS!! All versions of Flash are blocked by default in Firefox as of now. To be clear, Flash is only blocked until Adobe releases a version which isn't being actively exploited by publicly known vulnerabilities," Schmidt said. This has been a bad month for Adobe and... Read more...
We reported last week on a new zero-day vulnerability in Adobe Flash that was revealed following the leak of data from the Italian hacking group "Hacking Team". It's hardly a surprise when such a vulnerability is found in either Flash or Java, and as sad as it is, it's not even surprising to learn that two more have been found. Oy! The latest vulnerabilities, named CVE-2015-5122 and CVE-2015-5123, are considered critical, and affect the Flash player on Windows, OS X, and Linux. A verbatim threat to last week's vulnerability, "successful... Read more...
OCZ is launching a brand new series of solid state drives today, dubbed the Trion 100. Early prototypes of the drives were shown off at CES a few months back, but the drives are now ready for primetime. We should note that the Trion 100 series breaks some new ground for OCZ. Not only are they the first drives from the company to use TLC NAND, but they’re also the first to use all in-house Toshiba technology with the drive's Flash memory and controller both designed and built by Toshiba.The OCZ Trion 100 series is targeted at budget conscious consumers and users still contemplating the upgrade from... Read more...
This week, something nearly as common as breathing happened: a severe Adobe Flash vulnerability was revealed. How this one came to be, however, is far more interesting than most. Earlier this week, a well-known Italian hacking group called 'Hacking Team' was itself hacked. On Monday, the group's Twitter account was hijacked to post a link to a torrent file that includes about 400GB worth of its data. We're now finding out that this data could have huge repercussions for software vendors and regular consumers alike. Because Hacking Team's efforts largely revolve around exploiting bugs in popular... Read more...
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