Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Ultrabook Review

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Ultrabooks continue to be the hot trend in the Windows notebook arena. With the recent introduction of Intel's new, low power 3rd generation Ivy Bridge Core series processors, designs are becoming thinner with every iteration, while paradoxically it seems, performance continues to scale higher.  We've seen Ultrabook machines from virtually all the majors here at HotHardware and many of them are targeted at consumers on the go where thin is in, and not so much the business user, where practical usability, durability and performance are critical.  Lenovo however, is stepping outside the box with the latest addition to their ThinkPad lineup for road warriors and cubical commandos alike.

The venerable Lenovo ThinkPad, with its little red TrackPoint nub has gone the way of the Ultrabook.  If there's one small dig ThinkPads have taken with regularity over the years, it's that though there's a ton of quality and substance built into these machines, style was not a hallmark of the brand.  The all new ThinkPad X1 Carbon could very well change the utilitarian stereotype of the Lenovo's business-backed line-up, however.  It's very well-made like a ThinkPad should be but it's thin, sleek and dare we say sexy?  Go-on little ThinkPad, back that a... oh never mind.  Let's run down the specs and stick with the program.
ThinkPad X1 Carbon Edge


Lenovo ThinkPad Carbon X1 Ultrabook
Specifications & Features
Let's start by covering some detail that you can't glean from the above spec list. The SSD on board the ThinkPad X1 Carbon that we tested is a 128GB SandDisk mSATA model that has a fair bit of punch, especially on the read side of things.  Other notables are the machine's 14-inch panel with a native resolution of 1600X900.  It might not be the brightest LCD in the lab at 300 nits but it's bright enough and its native resolution seems like a perfect fit for 14 inches of real estate.  More on this later. For its on-board power source, we've got a 45Whr battery strapped in for good (it's not user serviceable, which is common for Ultrabooks these days), capable of providing over 6 hours of uptime backed up by Lenovo's RapidCharge technology that'll re-juice the machine up to 80% (5+Hrs) in only 35 minutes.

Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon
Ahh but here's where the rubber meets the proverbial road.  The above table was provided by the folks in Lenovo Product Marketing.  As you can see, they're quick to point out that the ThinkPad X1 Carbon is one of the thinnest, lightest machines on the market currently and it weighs in at a mere 3 pounds soaking wet. For a 14-inch machine that's almost ridiculously light.  What isn't so light, however, is the X1 Carbon's price point. Starting at $1399 ($1499 as tested), though this ThinkPad excels beyond Intel's Ultrabook spec in many areas, it falls short of Intel's $799 - $999 Ultrabook pricing goal in exchange for higher-end components and build quality.  Regardless, let's journey on for a closer look around this sliver of technological wonderment.

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Think pad, tablet, pads... just usr your smart phone and just save up for a gaming rig

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Lol, sorry but I'm not going to try working with spread sheets on my phone. Need a much bigger screen for that. :-)

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This is a great laptop except it was just released so if you're buying it now, it makes you an "early adopter" and pioneer to help Lenovo discover issues.

The Lenovo forums and web is abuzz of owners complaining about unexpected power off's, overheating, LCD flicker and everything else except for solid build that you'd expect from a ThinkPad.

The angry owners are receiving unofficial help from a wide base of loyal / longtime, repeat ThinkPad owners who are enjoying troubleshooting this first release just as much as they enjoyed discovering the last first release but legendary ThinkPad quality is often unofficially tested by the loyal user community.

It may be worthwhile waiting for the next revision in a few months before rushing out to buy the current X1's since the bugs are still being worked out.

P.S., I suggest check for low price of this laptop at: laptopdeals2k12.blogspot.com/p/lenovo-thinkpad-x1.html

Hope this review is helpful.

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I can't be the only one that hates Lenovo.

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Actually, you might be. :)

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I would much rather dell XD

 

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Lenovo is a fantastic company that has always been a consistent competitor in computing power. they have kept a mantra of consistency and performance that has kept them solvent and given them a competitive edge. Their dedication to meet the needs of everyday users and bringing technology to students and teachers borders on revolutionary.

The Lenovo idea pad tablet series struggled but their computers have always been high quality and top of the line.

Jaybk26 your the only one that hates good companies.

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yes, a good company indeed however, im not sure i would need a computer that went completely flat...

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I have had nothing but horrible experiences with Lenovo and the last Lenovo tablet I used was abysmal.  I'm not that big of a fan of Android's OS and the hardware was just pathetic.  But clearly I'm on the losing side of a battle:D

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Tablets and computers are computers are completely different playing fields so you're anger might be misdirected, However "If you ever find yourself agreeing with the majority, Stop and reflect" Mark Twain :)

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