Warner Pulls Music Vids from YouTube

Early Saturday, Warner removed all of the labels music videos from YouTube after negotiations broke down regarding its licensing agreement with the Google owned video website.

This development came as all four major labels including Universal Music Group, Sony Music, and EMI are in negotiations about their licensing deals with YouTube.

"We are working actively to find a resolution with YouTube that would enable the return of our artists' content to the site," Warner said in a statement. "Until then, we simply cannot accept terms that fail to appropriately and fairly compensate recording artists, songwriters, labels and publishers for the value they provide."

YouTube has become an important revenue stream for at least one of the top labels. This week, Rio Caraeff, Universal Music's digital chief, told CNET News that YouTube has generated "tens of millions" of dollars for the recording company this year, up 80 percent from last year.

Caraeff said that Universal and YouTube enjoy a strong relationship and that the companies are trying to expand their relationship beyond music videos. A source close to Universal said that the label will likely book nearly $100 million in video-streaming revenue--most of it from YouTube.

According to the blog All Things Digital, the labels are reaping benefits from the YouTube deal but the website is not as it has to compensate the labels each time a video clip is viewed.

By pulling out of the deal with YouTube, Warner loses access to the Web's No. 1 video site, which topped 100 million visitors in October. The site has increasingly become one of the Internet's favorite ad-supported jukeboxes. Of the top 10 YouTube channels, 7 are music related. Warner Bros. Records is the 11th largest channel.

"If we can't reach acceptable business terms, we must part ways with successful partners," Google said Friday on its blog. "For example, you may notice videos that contain music owned by Warner Music Group being blocked from the site.


Some of Warner's most popular artists, who will no longer be available on YouTube, include Led Zeppelin, Madonna, TI, Eric Clapton, REM, Red Hot Chili Peppers, and the Grateful Dead
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Via:  CNET
Tags:  music, YouTube, video
Comments
3vi1 5 years ago

ROFLMAO at Warner's greed.

As a child of the 70's and 80's, I recall the exact instant music videos came about. And how they EXPLODED: creating half a dozen late night video shows and finally MTV. This only happened because the labels and every artist saw how much a good video translated into increased album/concert sales.

Now, they somehow think the video is the "product" instead of an advertisement.

YouTube should tell them to go for a walk and good luck.

arnelcoleman 5 years ago
This is sad knowing that Youtube has been the music paradise for all who just want to streamline music videos. I was just hoping that they come to terms with Warner music soon, because both companies has been good partners for quite a while already. We all love good music so this is really untimely. Ever wonder how is it to be index your music on Google. You upload music, you were the one to give it a title and soon after a couple of days, you will be able to see what you upload in the Google top 10. And you can upload as many videos as you'd like. Cool,right. Right. Check out http://www.themusicage.com to learn more about this amazing stuff. Its your new gateway to cool!
Anonymous 5 years ago

I was a professional touring DJ from 1988-2000 and received tons upon tons of promos from the labels. The cost to press, package, and ship 12" dance vinyl to DJ's, record pools, and radio stations far outweighs the insignificant costs of promoting a track on youtube and the audience reach is a million-fold. They don't know how good they have it.

bob_on_the_cob 5 years ago

[quote user="kewlncguy"]

I was a professional touring DJ from 1988-2000 and received tons upon tons of promos from the labels. The cost to press, package, and ship 12" dance vinyl to DJ's, record pools, and radio stations far outweighs the insignificant costs of promoting a track on youtube and the audience reach is a million-fold. They don't know how good they have it.

[/quote]

Bet that's a cool gig. Youtube really reaches the masses. I have seen youtube videos on the news before.

 

kid007 5 years ago

What? I can't watch Music Videos anymore? oh geez what would i do now?

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