Sony's Howard Stringer Talks Up "New" TV Approach - HotHardware
Sony's Howard Stringer Talks Up "New" TV Approach

Sony's Howard Stringer Talks Up "New" TV Approach

If Apple isn't going to reinvent the TV market, who is? Maybe it's Sony, despite the company seemingly backing off of efforts in recent years. According to a new Wall Street Journal article, Sony CEO Howard Stringer recently stated that his company is developing a "new kind" of TV. He also stated that "TV manufacturers, driven by their desire to rack up market share, have bred an intensely competitive market. As a result, they are scrambling to come up with a new generation of TV sets that will separate them from the pack and command premium prices" He didn't discuss specifics, but added: "There's a tremendous amount of R&D going into a different kind of TV set."

When asked, he confirmed that there was "no doubt" that Steve Jobs was also working on revolutionizing the TV. Howard make quite the shocking statement with this: "We can't continue selling TV sets [the way we have been]. Every TV set we all make loses money."


What's next for TVs? Who knows. So long as the arcane pay-TV infrastructure remains in power, it'll be nigh impossible for TV makers to truly revolutionize the industry. A TV will simply be a TV without a special new interface. And if Apple can't pull it off... Good luck, Sony!
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When I was reading up on the Apple TV, I was thinking more about the colors and details that it would provide, not the interface. Frankly I don't care that much for the interface as others should as I use my TV mostly for TV watching (and some gaming) and not for much else...

The idea of a new interface does sound interesting but really; the interface is only just one of the problem. For a TV like that to truly replace everything else, it has to support the latest version of CableCARD, interact with a variety of devices (such as Game Consoles) and be as seamless as possible. While the technology is there and the latest version of CableCARD is capable of VoD (the most essential part of a cable TV experience.) and Pay Per View... A TV like the one Apple or Sony mentioned is not out there in the wild...

Now, I don't know why they don't make a TV like that, is it because of some sort of conspiracy or is it because they can't seem to afford to make the devices... The reason may be unknown but the technology is there, why don't they do anything with it?

Another thing about a TV like that is the interface that may connect the devices to it... Now in order for it to work it has to be sponsored by a couple of companies, be completely adaptable and be completely reasonable to the consumer... Now we've had stuff to connect video input to the TV (HDMI, DVI, DisplayPort) but we've had nothing that can do both, which is display video and control the device at the same time. While this may not be what Sony is going for, it's the best idea I can think of that's appropriate, I mean what's cooler then turning on a device using your TV? However, it's going to be hard to find an acceptable standard, even though fiber optics (which allow for massive bandwith) is available; nor would it even be pratical in today's market...

So I guess the public-relations troubled Sony has a bit of an uphill battle ahead when it comes to a revolutionary TV.

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@Taylor good points. I think part of the reason we don't see cable card capable TVs is somewhat the fault of the cable companies. They would much rather rent you a cable box for each and every one of your TVs that they can control completely. They can't control your devices with a cable card.

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Cut the cable. Seriously, if you can get decent broadband, all you need is the "basic" cable package. A set-top box like the Roku (starting at $50 now) can provide nearly everything you can get on cable, and in most cases without having to pay for the added content. Things like Netflix and Amazon Video on Demand still cost extra, but I've found that there's absolutely nothing on cable that I can't live without (in fact, live without *and* be happier).

You don't need a cable card. You don't need cable TV (again, except to get local broadcast stations if you live in a poor reception spot for over-the-air broadcasts, like me).

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