Safer Li-ion Batteries Are On The Way, Thanks To Science

Safer Li-ion Batteries Are On The Way, Thanks To Science

Over the years, exploding batteries have becoming quite the issue in consumer electronics (as seen here in this melted iPhone). And not just exploding, but overheating, melting and combusting ones, too. But now, we're making progress on potentially stopping that ruckus. Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., have developed an inexpensive sensor that can warn of impending catastrophic failure in lithium-ion batteries. The sensor is based on the researchers' discovery of an intrinsic relationship between the internal temperature of lithium-ion cells and an easily measured electrical parameter of the cell.

Due to their high energy density, lithium-ion batteries power millions of consumer electronic devices and are the most common type of battery used in hybrid and electric vehicles. They are also growing in popularity for power grid, military, and aerospace applications.

But safety concerns remain a challenge to the industry. Battery malfunction and fires in electric vehicles, mobile phones and laptop computers have been reported in the media. Such failures typically result from thermal runaway, a self-perpetuating condition that occurs once a cell reaches a critical temperature.


"An abnormally high internal cell temperature is a nearly universal manifestation of something going awry with the cell," says Rengaswamy Srinivasan, a chemist in APL's Research and Exploratory Development Department and one of the inventors. "These changes can occur within seconds, leading to a potentially catastrophic event if corrective measures are not taken immediately. When things start to go wrong inside the cell, time is not on your side."

Srinivasan and his colleagues discovered that a very small alternating current, when applied to a lithium-ion battery at specific frequencies, is modified by the cell in a way that is directly related to the temperature of the critical electrochemical interface between the electrodes and the electrolyte. The sensor operates through a simple electrical connection at the positive and negative terminals of the cell and can operate using power from the battery it is monitoring. With multiplexing circuitry, a single sensor can monitor multiple cells in a battery pack.

"At the heart of lithium battery safety is not only the development of safer battery chemistries, but also the availability of accurate and reliable technologies that measure the actual battery cell temperature," says Michael Hickman, APL's technology commercialization manager for the sensor. "This technology provides the most accurate and immediate method available for measuring the true temperature of a lithium-ion cell; and, it is the only method for measuring a cell's temperature where it counts: inside the cell where temperature changes originate."

Now that we're on the brink of a safer battery, could anyone develop a notebook battery that'll actually last all day? Thanks in advance.
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What is it that causes melting and combustion exactly?

If its just overheating then shouldn't they be working on new ways to cool/divert heat from lithium ion batteries??

A thermometers great progress towards detecting heat problems, but hows a user supposed to solve the problem or prevent melting or combustion considering time isn't on their side?

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Spam Wench deleted,........Surprise

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