New MT9 Digital Audio Format Has Six Channels - HotHardware
New MT9 Digital Audio Format Has Six Channels

New MT9 Digital Audio Format Has Six Channels

Watch out MP3, AAC, WMA, FLAC, and Ogg Vorbis--there's a new digital audio format about to be introduced and it's creators are setting their sites on it becoming the new "de facto standard" for digital audio. The new format is called Music 2.0 and it will use MT9 as its file extension: 

"The distinctive feature of [the] MT9 format is that it has a six-channel audio equalizer, with each channel dedicated to voice, chorus, piano, guitar, base and drum. For example, if a user turns off the voice channel, it becomes a karaoke player. Or one can turn off all the instruments and concentrate on the voice of the main singer as if he or she is singing a cappella." 



The MT9 concept is the brainchild of South Korean-based, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute--a non-profit research organization, funded by the South Korean government. Another South Korean company, Audizen, is to taking the lead on trying to get large-scale commercial acceptance of the new format. The Korea Times reports that both Samsung and LG Electronics have already expressed interest in the new format.

The Korea Times goes on to report that the MT9 format "was selected as a candidate item for the new digital music standard at a regular meeting of Motion Picture Experts Group (MPEG), the international body of the digital music and video industry, held in France late April." The article further reports that an Audizen representative "is expecting it will be formerly selected as an international standard in the MPEG forum's next meeting to be held in Germany [in] June."

Future users of this new digital audio format should be happy to hear that (at least for now) the current incarnation of MT9 doesn't use any DRM (digital rights management). Depending on how widespread the adoption of this new audio format becomes, Audizen anticipates not just new music being encoded using MT9, but also envisions older music being re-mastered as well:

"If you are a serious guitar-master wannabe and you want to focus on the tune of Brian May's guitar and don't want to hear Freddie Mercury's voice and Roger Tailor drumming in Queen songs, then this may be what you have been looking for." 
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This sounds like it could be a huge development.  However, how will it tell what instrument is which?  If I take a current mp3 or wav and convert it to mt9, will it automatically know?  Or will it have to be specifically made by a professional? 

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 Sound awesome. But like Crisis Causer said willl it be able to detect instruments.

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SqUiD267:

 Sound awesome. But like Crisis Causer said willl it be able to detect instruments.

I dont know if this will answer your question but here it is!

Well, Korean engineers have taken us one step closer to Utopia with the design of a new digital music format that is able to separate sounds, such as specific instruments and even voices. Guitars, piano, chorus, drum, voice and base are all divided via the new MT9 extension’s six-channel audio equalizer.

This could mean instant instrumentals for all rap-hopefuls to get a good 16 in on, or flawless a capellas for DJ-mixes and blend tapes. Musicians can easily learn their favorite tune by singling out their instrument of choice.

As digital music has become easier to pirate, this may further crush the industry as it will allow total control over file, killing the reason some people still buy singles — i.e. a capella and instrumental. Adding to the piracy, MT9’s have no DRM which will allow them to be copied freely.

This new music format will bear a MT9 extension — versus to the MP3 we’ve grown accustomed to — and will go by Music 2.0 out on the market. Music 2.0 is said to be compatible with iPhones, PCs, cell phones and even karaoke bars, which will be a big market for the new format.

MT9 was created by the Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute with Audizen tackling the task of commercializing this innovation. The Motion Picture Experts Group have immediately selected MT9 as a prospect for the new standard in digital music in April and will have a follow-up in June.

ETRI is currently said to hold two foreign patents, six domestic patents, and will fire for two more this year. Audizen already has MT9 albums for sale on their website for 2000 won (14 USD) and claims that older records can be remastered to MT9.

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amdcrankitup:

SqUiD267:

 Sound awesome. But like Crisis Causer said willl it be able to detect instruments.

I dont know if this will answer your question but here it is!

Well, Korean engineers have taken us one step closer to Utopia with the design of a new digital music format that is able to separate sounds, such as specific instruments and even voices. Guitars, piano, chorus, drum, voice and base are all divided via the new MT9 extension’s six-channel audio equalizer.

 

 

Looks like it can.

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We'll see about that.  But good news, so far. 

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Well this part works for me!

Unlike other digital formats exclusively used by big companies such as SK Telecom, Audizen allows users to copy the MT9 files, making it a more attractive format. ``It's like having a CD or cassette tape. Once you buy it, you can lend it to your friends. We don't want to be too fussy about DRM (digital right management),'' he said. 
 

That just pisses Bill off when we do that!

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 The ipod sorta has this feature go to the EQ settings, you can choose Bass Booster and  now it like karoke, kinda sorta.

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Of course it can't separate them from a single or stereo audio channels. It can't "detect" anything, it's a way of storing audio. No, it can't take your mp3s or CDs and separate the instruments. It has to be made this way from tracks that are separate to begin with.

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if it works this sounds pretty cool.. and i'm about as non audiophile as you can get

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