MusicDNA Attempts To Oust MP3 At Top Digital Music File Format - HotHardware
MusicDNA Attempts To Oust MP3 At Top Digital Music File Format

MusicDNA Attempts To Oust MP3 At Top Digital Music File Format

The replacement of the MP3 has been coming forever, or so we've heard, but the ubiquitous file format has yet to really be toppled by anything else. Apple's AAC format is highly popular amongst iPod and iPhone users, but by and large, the de facto music format when it comes to digital is MP3. One has to assume that the format's run will end at some point, though, just as VHS and DVD runs ended when newer, larger and more clear formats were developed.

Is this the end for MP3? Only time will tell, but a leading tech company is hoping to launch a new digital music file format that will add several features currently unavailable to MP3. Things like embedded lyrics/artwork would be included, but the real kicker is that these files could be sent updates from the artist or label in order to showcase news updated and tour images. The new music proposal is called MusicDNA, and astoundingly enough, it has the support of the creator of MP3. You might find it odd that the maker of MP3 would back something to eventually replace MP3, but we guess that's just the spirit of innovation at work.



BACH Technology also noted that anyone who downloaded a pirated MusicDNA format would still be able to play it back, but those future news updates would not reach the pirating user. We like this approach. It keeps DRM out of the equation, yet it still provides a legitimate reason for users to buy the file. It's one of the first win-win situations we can think of in the digital music industry.

BACH is currently looking for label and retail support, but we can't imagine that to be an easy chore. The company admits that early feedback is very positive, and the fact that MusicDNA files could be played back on any MP3 player (Apple's lineup included) makes things all the more easier. A new file format wouldn't stand much of a chance, but it these files can step right in and work on every PC and portable music player created in past decade, then we actually see a glimmer of hope for success.
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I heard that this format would only play static to people with copies of the files that weren't purchased, which I would see as the format dieing before it started. If there isn't any DRM type thing built in, as you say, it might be a worthwhile format to look into.

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I'm seeing a lot of spacing errors in the above article, such as "iPhoneusers" "atsome" "largerand" in the first paragraph. Formatting errors?

 

Anyway, back to the subject. As long as I can play non-DRM music, this doesn't affect me. Also, the part about the updates to the music files...does this mean the MusicDNA files will be constantly updating themselves whenever I connect to the internet? And will we be seeing a significant difference in size of the music files?

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gibbersome said:  "does this mean the MusicDNA files will be constantly updating themselves whenever I connect to the internet?"

I see it as somebody out in cyberspace looking at your music collection and making adjustments to it in the background and using YOUR bandwidth to do it. It doesn't get anymore "Big Brother" than this when they manage your music files for you. What records will they be keeping of your music collection? What's to stop them from delving deeper into your computer's nether regions if they already have Cart Blanche with the music folder? This idea has more holes in it than Swiss Cheese.


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I agree with realneil on his big brother assessment. Either way I don't think Mp3 is going anywhere.

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>> Is this the end for MP3?

Yeah! And, remember when everyone dumped Unisys's patent-encumbered 256-color GIFs in favor of open PNG files that supported compression and 24-bit colors? Oh wait... there are multiple GIFs on this very page.

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I've been collecting 192Kbit/s MP3's ripped with AudioGrabber for many, many years. I buy used CD's at the swap meets for a buck. I get them from Garage Sales too. I have thousands upon thousands of songs so far. When I want to hear them, I play them and it works,...they sound good. I could play songs without repeating any of them for weeks if I had a reason to. I have a Linux box that serves them up to any/all of my computers. I have about 80 huge playlists for any mood that I may be in. This whole music thing has taken years to develop and will never be done until I croak.

I should change now?

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Yeah, this is exactly the issue, here. So many people have so many mp3s that they are not going to go away for a long time. I have about 11k, myself, mostly acquired by the same means. I've only bought about 2k of those online. There's no way I'd ever switch to such a format, so I really don't know what they're expecting to accomplish here. I suppose you can't blame them for trying, though.

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MusicDNA sounds like it has DRM written all over it... no pun intended... ok, ok, intended.

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Waiting for more information to form an opinion but I see the potential in this format. I wish someone can devise a means of having DRM, without it in the end screwing over the owner of the media.

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I think it has just as much potential as any other totally useless idea.

Long ago, we, the people, already determined what the standard would be when they tried to shove WMA's down our throats and we choked on the idea. Who were they to tell us not to rip our own music? At first, we were threatened with legal trouble for doing so. Our response was a collective and resounding, "KISS MY ASS!" that reverberated throughout the internet. We adopted mp3's because they're better sounding, and come without DRM. There are other existing standards that offer certain advantages, but converting 47,000 files to another format would be a PITA of epic proportions and would result in no better quality in most cases for me.

I'm a firm believer in "If It Works, Don't Fix It".

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Does anyone really care to have artwork and lyrics in your music? Personally, if you want the lyrics, google is there but it just seems as s plausible way to mask their intention of screwing around with you. And what about these updates? Do artists sit around thinking up of version 1.1 of their song or they move on to the next? Something stinks here and frankly, I like the smell of my mp3s - so no thanks.

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