Mobile Music Downloads Still Struggling To Take Off - HotHardware
Mobile Music Downloads Still Struggling To Take Off

Mobile Music Downloads Still Struggling To Take Off

The music industry as we know it is undergoing serious turmoil. Technology has advanced far more quickly than music labels have, and it feels like they're still grasping for a new business model. A lot of things are moving in various directions; there's iTunes, there's the various subscription services, there's the CD business and there's the mobile music business. iTunes has obviously done well for itself, overtaking Wal-Mart as the largest seller of music in the United States. Rhapsody and Zune subscription services also have great value, but one area that's struggling mightily is the mobile download avenue.

It's odd to think that a mobile service would be struggling given the explosion in popularity of smartphones and mobile data consumption. Nearly everything in mobile has been used more now than ever; people are more connected to mobile maps, mobile social networking apps, etc. But mobile downloads in music? Not so much. According to a new report on the matter, less than 2% of mobile users in the U.S. and western Europe have "used their phone to download music in the first quarter."


24% of users used their phones to listen to music, but obviously, the vast majority loaded those songs before they left the house. The biggest problem is usability. Most mobile download services aren't easy and quick to navigate. Mobile users are typically on-the-go, with only a small amount of time to tinker with their phone and find whatever music they may be craving. But even with sophisticated services, such as the mobile version of iTunes, it's not very convenient to download a song onto a device and then try to get it onto your PC later. Also, when stuck in spotty 3G areas (or worse, 2G/EDGE), it could take quite awhile to download an entire album.

Is there any way for music companies to convince more mobile users to access, download and buy music on their phones? It's hard to say, but honestly a lot of it is out of their hands. Once 4G covers the nation, now that might be a different story...

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I hate the iTunes store and the concept. Who would want to have their purchased music to have DRM crap and moreover I am pretty sure these days iPOD and its siblings are not the only music players in a typical household. They should start selling labels @ a discount than those available @ the retail store, and they can also provide them in a microSD form ready to consume. Like you pic a collection of your fav songs. pay for it and it gets shipped to you in a MicroSD form. But again here is where the costing of the tracks matter.

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People to busy using Limewire I suppose.

Lou

www.complete-anonymity.at.tc

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I listen to my iPod when I want to hear portable music. I've bought 5 songs ever from Apple, and the DRM does suck. That's why I quit doing it and never looked back. I hear that you can pay more for songs without DRM included, but don't really need them. My classic rock collection (my preferred music) is friggin' huge. My 160GB iPod has 98GB of songs and movies on it. Indifferent

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There's also the problem of some mobile phones not allowing downloading into their music folder. Some mobile phones are just too closed and as stated in the article bandwidth limitation on mobile subscriptions is a problem as well. 4G might allow for quicker transfers but it won't stop the 100-500MB subscriptions.

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One of the biggest problems is that most mobile music downloads are only for the mobile device and can not be moved to any other platform. I don't know about you, but if I buy a song I want to stick it on my computer and car (has an internal music HDD) as well.

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