Linus Torvalds Announces Release of Linux 3.9

Linus Torvalds Announces Release of Linux 3.9

Following what Linus Torvalds called a "very quiet" week, the Finnish American open-source software guru officially released the Linux 3.9 kernel. The latest kernel had been in development for 10 weeks and includes a device mapper target that allows a user to configure a solid state drive (SSD) as a cache for hard disk drives (HDDs) to increase system performance.

The release comes a week later than Torvalds would have liked, though he seemed more concerned with people trying to "game the system" than with the slight delay.

Linux Geek
Image Source: Flickr (LuChOeDu)

"So the last week was much quieter than the preceding ones, which makes me suspect that one reason -rc7 was bigger than I liked was that people were gaming the system and had timed some of their pull requests for just before the release, explaining why -rc7 was big enough that I didn't actually want to do a final release last week. Please don't do that," Torvalds stated in his official announcement.

There's quite a bit that's new and/or improved in Linux 3.9, including improved support for the F2FS (Flash Friendly File System) file system for Samsung developers, improved ARM support, a Zero-Power optical device driver, audio and sound improvements, initial support for AMD Radeon HD 8000 Series graphics cards, better power management, faster LZO compression, experimental RAID 5/6 support for the Btrfs file system, and more.
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I wish windows developed more like this.

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Nice well done Mr.torvalds. although isn't saying F2FS file system like saying ATM machine?

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That's really good for Linux. I'm happy to see them making big improvements to there system. And plus I'm part finish so I have to support my heritage.

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How long does it usually take to incorporate a new kernel into Linux distros?

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realneil:

How long does it usually take to incorporate a new kernel into Linux distros?

Quite awhile apparently.  Just look at how long it took to get here XD

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realneil:

How long does it usually take to incorporate a new kernel into Linux distros?

Rolling releases can have them officially incorporated very quickly.  3.9 is in the Arch testing repos now, for people that want the bleeding edge.  

Non-rolling releases (like Ubuntu), typically don't upgrade the kenel on the fly - they only release security and important updates for the kernel they ship with.

That doesn't mean you can't upgrade Ubuntu 13.04 to the 3.9 kernel.. easily, and right now though. It's as simple as going to the mainline kernel repo (http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v3.9-raring/) and downloading the *_i86 or *_amd debs, depending on you architecture (Also grab the *_all file). From a command line cd into your download directory and just run 'sudo dpkg -i linux-*' (without the parens), reboot, and you're on the new kernel.  There's more detailed information/instructions at https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Kernel/MainlineBuilds.

For any other distro, even if they didn't have 3.9 available, you can always download the kernel source (https://www.kernel.org/) and compile it yourself.  It's not as hard as it sounds, and there are walk-throughs for a lot of distros.

I'm running 3.9 myself, as it's the kernel that's already in the Ubuntu 13.10 (saucy salamander) repos:

evil@saturn:~$ uname -a
Linux saturn 3.9.0-0-generic #3-Ubuntu SMP Mon Apr 29 23:13:07 UTC 2013 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

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