Free Ride Ends For Users Of Windows 7 RC - HotHardware
Free Ride Ends For Users Of Windows 7 RC

Free Ride Ends For Users Of Windows 7 RC

If you're still running Windows 7 Release Candidate, you've likely begun to experience bi-hourly shutdowns. Microsoft released the RC in May as a final public test before the RTM build in July. While the RC version has been free to use without restrictions since its release, Microsoft has made it clear that it planned to discontinue the free ride starting March 1.

Users who have ignored the regular pop-up warnings that let you know of the RC's expiration will now experience a shutdown every two hours. The shutdowns will continue through June 1, 2010. After June 1, your wallpaper will be removed and a message will appear to tell you "This copy of Windows is not genuine." In addition, you will no longer be able to get optional updates and other downloads that require genuine Windows validation.



Because the bi-hourly shutdowns will not save your work automatically, you risk losing data by continuing to use the pre-release version of Windows 7. In order to avoid the shutdowns and data loss, you'll need to reinstall the operating system that was on the machine before RC or install a fully licensed and paid-for version of Windows 7. Should you need instructions to help walk you through the installation process, Microsoft provides them here. If you're moving to a released version of Windows 7, you'll need to do a custom, or clean, install to replace the RC version.
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A custom, clean install to replace the RC version? So whichever way you look at it, a new OS will need to be installed before June 1st.

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Actually, I don't really blame them. M$ has let people keep using the RC for a good long while after the official release of their 'for money' OS.

I do think the fact that they did not have a smooth RC to release version upgrade that allows you to keep all your installs and settings though is a dumb mistake.

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You can do a in place upgrade from the RC if you have Ultimate. I couldn't quite drop the $500 on a 3 pack of ultimate though so I got 2 copies of home premium. I really never get in Windows on my laptop anyway. I always use Ubuntu. So I've got Jen's PC and mine all set up with fresh installs. I had actually forgot all about the deadline until Jen got a popup. I've had the disks for some time. Just putting off the installs.

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I agree infinity I also think the Beta then RC idea was a good one. It enabled them to gather exactly what a large number of the public wanted to see as a OS package. This which many of us know may have been features etc, that an experienced computer user, programmer, developer might very well not think of allowed them a very different approach I think. Of course Linux and other open source OS packages have had this for years. So I believe it was in the least a smart business plan especially for this type of thing as a build platform. As for the RC to full upgrade infinity mentions, I think that would have also been a good idea as well as being a miss for them in a business sense, and in a increased gained usage scenario as well.

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Agreed with all you, they have been using free version for a while now so instead of freelancing its time to get their paid product :D, i still have the rc version on my harddrive though :D lol

@infinity that i true, its basically the same product so why didn't they have an upgrade option -.- (there seems to be a hack that allows you to upgrade though)

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I got win7 ultimate, and I am pretty happy with it. Too bad for the ppl still using the RC :(

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:D i got a copy of windows 7 pro and home upgrades, i also recently got a windows 7 home from a contest (legit)

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Of course, you could alway just set the PC clock back. :p

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Does that work, 3vi1? I'd imagine that Microsoft was smarter than that-- though they've had some odd lapses in the past. I guess if you were running a non-networked computer and turned off network time you might be able to convince it.

The thing is, you would want to choose a rollback time that was compatible with the current calendar. That way, your Calendar widget could display the right day of the week, given the day and month, if you see what I mean. I took a look at calendar equivalents recently, because I want to use antique newspapers as props in my job (first-person historic interpreter) and wanted the weekdays to work out right.

2010 has lots of calendar analogues, and the one I chose was 1841, a tumultuous year for Philadelphia (the "know-nothing" party rioted on July 4, burning down a church to protest immigration, among other things). Therefore, if you set the year back to 1841, when you look at the Calendar it'll display the right weekday.

The only problem is that you need to power your Babbage Calculation Engine using steam power.

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>> Does that work, 3vi1? I'd imagine that Microsoft was smarter than that

Not sure, and I don't care enough about Win 7 to try. :p

If I were them, I would have it silently check in with some NTP server to confirm the date - but you might be able to detect/block this check by doing the change behind a firewall, sniffing the attempted traffic, then setting specific ACLs to block the checks. Again - more trouble than it's worth (for me at least).

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