E-book Sales Top All Other Book Format Types in February

E-book Sales Top All Other Book Format Types in February

In late January, Amazon.com announced that for the first time, paperbacks were outsold by e-books at its site (hardbacks had been eclipsed six months before). On Thursday, the Association of American Publishers (AAP) made it official overall: e-books are now the most popular U.S. reading format.

According to the AAP's report on February 2011 sales, e-books saw triple-digit percentage growth, 202.3%, when compared to February of 2010. Audiobooks also increased, 36.7 percent compared to last February.

Some caveats in the report. AAP partially attributes the rise in e-book sales in February to strong e-Book buying, or “loading,” by consumers who received e-book readers devices as holiday gifts. additionally, the report the expanded selection of both e-book readers and e-book titles as factors.

Another caveat: the AAP monthly and year-end sales report compiles data from 84 U.S. publishing houses representing major commercial, education, professional, scholarly and independents. Meanwhile, e-book data comes from only 16 publishing houses. The AAP admits its report "does not include all book and journal net sales, but provides what’s acknowledged as the best industry snapshot currently available."
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Sounds to me that the data is not really accurate enough. We will see over the next 12 months what happens though I truly believe that e-books will eclipse printed books. I am waiting to see the government release all their budgets and crap in e-book format I keep seeing footage on the news of expensive bound books containing each budget.

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[quote user="Sounds to me that the data is not really accurate enough. We will see over the next 12 months what happens though I truly believe that e-books will eclipse printed books. I am waiting to see the government release all their budgets and crap in e-book format I keep seeing footage on the news of expensive bound books containing each budget."]

I still think paperbound books will still have a purpose, they're good for reading if the power goes out and you lose your connection to the internet, and they're good for historical purposes in case the electronic solution doesn't work out for the government.

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I was thinking about this today. Without a doubt being able to read and actually feel the page is one of the subtle sensations that I'm going to hate parting with. Economically it makes sense but I'm afraid 40 years from now it'll be a "back in my day" scenario with the grand kids...

at least they wont be lugging 80 pounds in a rolling backpack come middle school (that's right, rolling backpacks. they'll be cool by then).

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The information from AAP and Amazon is probably a harbinger of things to come, a sad commentary on the decline and fall of literate civilization...

http://thehopelessbookaholic.blogspot.com/2011/04/books-kind-made-with-paper.html

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pjnissim - the "back in the day" scenario is so true! I fully expect that 30 years from now my grand kids will think I am OLD because I will still remember hauling mounds of textbooks to class.

Although we'll be giving up some of that tactile feel of "real" books, I'm hopeful my kids and grand kids won't have the same back issues I had while in school that were partially caused by a heavy backpack.

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I love print books, probably always will, but for Kindle authors like me this is good news.

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