Canada Okays Data Throttling In "Last Resort" Cases - Is America Next?

Canada Okays Data Throttling In "Last Resort" Cases - Is America Next?

Oh, Canada. What are you teaching those American regulators? While most consumer-oriented Americans (as in, the consumers themselves) are doing everything they can to resist the evil known as "data throttling," Canada's main telecommunication agency has just okayed the process. We're hoping this doesn't set some sort of precedence, but honestly, who knows how this will affect other nations (including America).

The CRTC, which has also been a recent pain for companies look to light up new high-def channels, has just passed regulations that will enable Internet providers to "throttle" traffic of its users. Of course, this rule only allows throttling--which involves the general slowing of throughput in order to increase the service level for most at the expense of a few heavy users--in rare, "last resort" scenarios, but it's going to be extremely hard to regulate this. How will the CRTC know when an ISP throttles? How will they know if it was a "last resort?" And who's the judge of what fits into the "last resort" category? Needless to say, there seems to be a lot of vagueness here, and it's all slanted toward to ISP and not the consumer.

The rule stipulates that ISPs are to use "economic measures" in order to better balance throughput before resorting to throttling, which could involve charging users more depending on how much bandwidth they use. The CRTC stated exactly: Technical means to manage traffic, such as traffic shaping, should only be employed as a last resort." The agency also claimed that there are "growing concerns about congestion," but we have to wonder if this isn't some knee-jerk reaction to a minor problem that's being talked up by loud-mouth ISPs who are scared are people actually taking advantage of the unlimited service that's being advertised and sold.



So, what's your take on all of this? Are you scared that such a decision could encourage something similar to happen in your country? Are we really getting to the point where video streaming and heavy use of the Internet service we're paying for is forcing ISPs to pay more or lobby for extra regulations?
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It gets worse. CRTC approved a terrible legislature that will damage differentiation on ISP resellers. In less than 2 months from now, resellers would be forced to comply with providing the same service in terms of bandwidth quota, speed and everything you can think of. It breaks every anti-trust laws in existence.

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I have lost all respect for the CRTC. Total BS!

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On the one hand you have everyone trying to sell you ever more expensive ways to use bandwidth and lots of it,...............................but the other is telling you to slow down,......you hog!

Let's call it the "Commerciamacon Factor"

They're making scads of money without investing in much new compression technology to make better use of what they have, and they're screaming at the FTC for more bandwidth daily.

The FTC should free up a certain amount of bandwidth for free public consumption if you have a compatible device. That will piss off the Telcos!

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I guess upgrading network capacity is the "After last resort".

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If their networks can't handle the huge amounts of bandwidth they are selling... then maybe they shouldn't be selling it! Isn't that like false advertising or something? Saying you can do this... but then saying you can't and how is throttling even remotely legal? If you're paying for the service then how can they try to limit yo uand still charge the same amount?

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