A Keyboard Designed For Germaphobes

A Keyboard Designed For Germaphobes

Cold and flu season isn't over yet. For those of you who want to avoid germs at all costs, Cleankeys recently introduced a keyboard that can easily be cleaned from germs. Whereas a traditional keyboard has lots of nooks and crannies that can harbor all sorts of bacteria and germs, the Cleankeys keyboard eliminates all of these hiding spots.

This flat keyboard is 100% touch sensitive, so all you'll have to do is wipe the keyboard down with a disinfecting cloth and you'll get rid of most of the germs. The average keyboard has 3,295 germs per square inch. By wiping a standard keyboard with a disinfecting cloth, you'll kill only about 5% of the bacteria. By wiping the Cleankeys keyboard with a disinfecting cloth, you'll get rid of 99% of these germs. This means you'll be left with mere 33 germs per square inch to deal with on the Cleankeys keyboard. Interestingly enough, the average toilet seat has about 49 germs per square inch, so the keyboard will be cleaner than your toilet.



The keyboard is flat and touch sensitive, so it will likely take some getting used to since there isn't any tactile feedback from the keys. The company claims users will see a 30% reduction in the speed of their typing compared to a standard keyboard, but “that time is typically made up many times in the time saved cleaning.” We don’t know how true that will be for an average user (how many of you actually spend hours cleaning your keyboard?), but for hospitals and similar settings, having an easy to clean keyboard may very well be worth it.

The Cleankeys keyboard is washable, has an integrated trackpad, and comes with a plastic or glass top for $400 and $450 respectively.
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This is a cool idea, but I don't think I could deal with a keyboard with no tactile feedback at all. The easy clean and as it is spoken about, its use in a hospital or other area where utmost cleaning is a necessity, this is a great product. I also replace my keyboard generally at least once a year.

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I can definitely see this being useful in certain niche markets (and possibly a blessing for OCD people). While the negatives on this model are a deal-killer for me, I'd love to have a keyboard I could throw in the dishwasher.

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>> I'd love to have a keyboard I could throw in the dishwasher.

Fun fact: You can run most through the dishwasher. I have a couple of Microsoft Naturals that have been through multiple times.

The trick is that you have to let them *COMPLETELY* dry before you use them. You can *NOT* be impatient. I lean mine in a corner of the room and flip their position daily for at *least* five days, usually about a week. I own two of them just so I will never be rushed on that step.

If the keyboard is not completely dry when you plug it in, you might as well just throw it in the trash because it will short-circuit and never work again.

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@3vi1 hum do i have to remove the board and wiring form the inside first? (just asking)

I got confused at this part "so the keyboard will be cleaner than your toilet." how does that prove anything? lol

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I would imagine not Inspector that is why they have to be totally dry b4 you plug them back in. I am going to get new keyboards soon, although it will not be one of these. It is a cool idea, but I have been typing to long to not have some physical feel to my keys. I know I would not like the keyboard for that reason the watertight cleanable part to it is great.

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@rapid ya i was thinking that too :D

Yep and i would imagine it that u have to learn how to type all over cause of hte feel and if u throw it out u got to relearn the feel of a normal keyboard...

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On another note besides my current posts on this one concerning key responsiveness. I also game almost entirely with a mouse and keyboard. So using a keyboard for movement is reflex to me, in which this one would not do at all.

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@Inspector:

Nope, you do not need to disassemble the board. You may want to rubber-band a plastic bag around the connector on the end (though I've run ones with PS/2 connectors through without that and suffered no ill effects).

You don't even need to remove the keys when doing this, though you can. I've taken them off on occasion and washed those in a sink with a soft toothbrush, but I usually leave them on.

Just make sure your dishwasher is *NOT* set to use the heated dry (never tried it, but I imagine it might damage some internals).

The last thing I'd say is that I don't typically use this as a normal cleaning regimen (though I have done it before using some working keyboards given to me second hand): I use this to save keyboards that would otherwise need to be trashed. Every time I spill a bit of rum & coke into the keyboard (i.e. knock a whole glass in there - lol), I yank the cord before it has a chance to fry, and use this trick to return it to normal operation. So, personally, I will never be sad if this doesn't work - you may feel differently if you put a working, expensive, kb in for routine cleaning.

The one time in 6 this did not work was when I was impatient, thought one must be dry by the second day, and plugged it in before it was truly completely dry.

Next week I'll tell you kids about the half-dozen times I've recovered data from a dead hard-drive using nothing but a household freezer!  lol

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HA lol 3vi1 u can really do that? recover data from a dead hard drive with a freezer???

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"plastic or glass top for $400 and $450 respectively"

This is what almost choked me when I read it. A $400-$450 Keyboard? WTF?!?!

If I was a trillion-dollar wonder and nothing was too expensive for me to buy,.....I wouldn't consider spending that much on a keyboard.

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@Inspector:

Depending on how it failed, yes - absolutely... sometimes.  I thought it was a myth the first time I heard it, but....

In my experience, about half the drives I've tried the trick with will spin up for at least five minutes - just enough time to do a targeted copy of specific data. I had a run of bad luck with refurbs from ComputerGeeks long ago, and I used this process to recover the latest revisions of my docs.

Just put the drive in a freezer bag (so you don't get any moisture on the PCB), throw it in the fridge for a few hours (others tell me that 30 minutes will do), then connect it to a PC before it has time to warm back up. Copy the important data *immediately*.

I suppose that with the right USB-IDE cable you could even leave it in the fridge, lol.

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HA lol i was just about to say have it connected in there while reading your post till the end 3vi1 :D.

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At last, a keyboard that Adrian Monk can use!

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Or he can just by a dishwasher and place it right next to his computer so when ever he needs it cleaned he can  toss it in there :D

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Sweet! No more cookie crumbs getting stuck under the keys!

However, I don't see getting much tactile response from this keyboard.

 

ClemSnide:

At last, a keyboard that Adrian Monk can use!

 

Indeed! Loved that show, even when the writing deteriorated towards the final couple of seasons.

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I'm a true germ freak so i'll take two!

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