Items tagged with Stanford

You know those people who always lose at video games and scream, “This game cheats for you!”? Stanford engineers have modified an Xbox 360 controller in such a way that a game can, actually, “cheat” for a given player. Well, sort of. The team, led by professor Gregory Kovacs and in collaboration with Texas Instruments, was looking at ways to measure physiological signals in gamers in order to dynamically adjust gameplay according to how a player is feeling about the current game. "If a player wants maximum engagement and excitement, we can measure when they are getting bored... Read more...
One of the difficulties in using solar panels is that solar panels aren't exactly easy to install. Most are big, stiff, fragile, and inefficient. But now, engineers at Stanford have developed a peel-and-stick alternative that sounds more like a 3M Post-It note than a scientific invention. The goal was to create flexible, decal-like solar panels that could be placed on and peeled off like a Band-aid, so that you could place them on random windows and places where green energy is needed. The new decals solve most of the issues that traditional solar panels presented, and while the technology is detailed... Read more...
Google made quite the deal about selecting Kansas City, Kansas (and eventually, the Kansas City everyone knows over in Missouri) to be its first major consumer test market for Google Fiber, but there's another small town in America taking part in the trial: Stanford. Being so close to Google's California headquarters didn't hurt, and of course, having one of the most well-respected schools on the planet there probably didn't hurt either. According to some residents of the town, the 1Gbps broadband service is now being rolled out, totally free for a year, as Google takes those 12 months to analyze... Read more...
Well, this was inevitable. It's clear that paper books aren't what they used to be, and it's clear that they'll never be as important and useful as they once were. The information and knowledge within their pages are still just as vital as ever, but the digital age has led to easier ways to consume that very information. The advent of the Internet, and to an extent, e-readers and tablets, has enabled consumers to read and consume text without having to check out an actual book. So, what happens to the biggest stockpiles of books? In the case of Stanford University's massive Engineering Library,... Read more...
Scientists at Stanford are working on an open source camera that could change the world of photography by giving programmers the power to change and add features to a camera via software updates. If the technology catches on, our cameras will no longer be limited by the software that comes pre-installed from the manufacturer.Nearly all of the features of the “Frankencamera,” including focus, exposure, shutter speed, and flash, are able to be controlled by software. According to Marc Levoy, professor of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering at Stanford, “The premise of the project is to... Read more...
Keith Fife and his colleagues at Stanford University have come up with they call a "multi-aperture image sensor," which allows digital pictures to collect and store depth-of-field information. Unlike other 3D camera setups, the data is gathered at the chip level, so no expensive and complicated multiple lens setups are required. Instead of devoting the entire sensor for one big representation of the image, Fife's 3-megapixel sensor prototype breaks the scene up into many small, slightly overlapping 16x16-pixel patches called subarrays. Each subarray has its own lens to view the world--thus the... Read more...