Items tagged with Internet

Usually when we hear of Internet cables being cut, it's due to curious (or hungry) sea creatures or ships accidentally severing them in the ocean. That's not the case in San Francisco. The Federal Bureau of Investigation is currently looking into ongoing physical attacks on bundles of high-capacity Internet cables, the latest of which took place on Tuesday.Apparently this has been going on for a year and includes at least 11 malicious incidents. Federal agents confirmed to USA Today that the Tuesday attack disrupted Internet service for businesses and residential customers in Sacramento and surrounding... Read more...
Researchers at the University of California in San Diego have just crafted a new fiber optic technology which could dramatically improve our Internet's backbone, as well as reduce costs. While fiber optic connections to the Internet are a luxury for home and business, they're imperative for the outside sources that bring us our data. The backbone of the entire Internet is laced head-to-toe in fiber, as it's the only possible option for delivering and sustaining the bandwidth needed to serve everyone. But, its current design has a couple of caveats. At the forefront, current technology doesn't allow... Read more...
It looks as though North Carolina’s municipal Internet fight is about to get a bit nastier. North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper has “gone to the mattresses” in order to stop the FCC from exerting its power over state affairs. But before we get into this latest development, we need a bit of a backgrounder.  The towns of Chattanooga, Tennessee and Wilson, North Carolina were at a time home to underdeveloped and poor-performing Internet solutions from companies like Comcast and Time Warner Cable. When neither ISP expressed any willingness to offer customers faster Internet speeds, both... Read more...
We've been hearing about this threat for what seems like forever, but now, it's really real. According to The Wall Street Journal, the United States has a mere 3.4 million IP addresses left in its stock, and those are expected to disappear at some point during the summer. There's only one solution: to accelerate the rollout of IPv6. When the IPv4 protocol was created in the 70s, it was designed with a 32-bit numbering scheme. Understandably, its creators thought 4.2 billion total addresses (2^32) was more than sufficient. But those creators wouldn't have been able to foresee the computing explosion... Read more...
Remember the terrible sounds your modem used to make when dialing up access to the Internet? In the early days, you had to monitor your minutes online, practice patience as pictures downloaded at a snail's pace, and tolerate trolls who would try to boot you offline with programs called punters. It was a crappy era for the Internet, and for more than 2.1 million people, they're still tolerating some of those headaches. According to AOL's financial results for the first quarter of its fiscal 2015, over 2.1 million people in the U.S. subscribe to its dial-up Internet service. And for the privilege... Read more...
Move over Google, and step aside AT&T, because here comes Cox with residential 1-gigabit Internet service of its own. Called G1GABLAST (Gigablast from here on out), the 1Gbps Internet service is now available in parts of Phoenix, Arizona; Orange County, California; Omaha, Nebraska; and Las Vegas, Nevada. Ultra high-speed Internet isn't anything new to Cox -- it's been offering business customers multi-gigabit options for over a decade. However, there's been a recent movement to bring 1Gbps service to home consumers, as both Google (Google Fiber) and AT&T (U-verse with AT&T GigaPower)... Read more...
As expected would happen, AT&T along with several other telecoms and cable companies have reportedly filed a stay request to prevent the Federal Communications Commission from reclassifying broadband Internet service as a public utility under Title II of the Communications Act, a piece of legislation that's over 80 years old.The FCC made the ruling back in February, and by reclassifying broadband as a public utility, the government arm gave itself power to implement net neutrality rules. At the same time, FCC chairman Tom Wheeler made it clear that the fear mongering over implementing dated... Read more...
Still licking its wounds following the spectacular collapse of its bid to acquire Time Warner Cable (TWC), Comcast is refocusing its energy on expanding 2Gbps fiber Internet across the country. Comcast kicked off its 2Gbps Gigabit Pro service in Atlanta, and later in parts of Florida and the San Francisco Bay Area. Gigabit Pro is now expanding to none other than Chattanooga, Tennessee. It was just seven years ago that Comcast threw down the gauntlet, suing the Chattanooga Electric Power Board (EPB) to block the creation of the city’s own fiber Internet and cable TV service. The EPB only took this... Read more...
The opposition to the $45 billion Comcast-Time Warner Cable merger is growing. Late last week, we reported that the Department of Justice (DOJ) antitrust division is damn near close to recommending that the deal be nuked. The DOJ’s recommendations could ultimately lead to a lawsuit aimed at stopping the deal in its tracks. For its part, Comcast contends that a merger with TWC would be good for consumers. “There is no basis for a lawsuit to block the transaction,” said Comcast spokeswoman Sena Fitzmaurice last week. Fitzmaurice went on to add that the deal would “result in significant consumer benefits... Read more...
Congratulations to residents of Chicago, who now have access to AT&T's blazing fast Gigapower broadband Internet service. Like Google's Fiber service, U-verse with AT&T Gigapower offers up to 1-gigabit per second downloads and uploads, which translates into being able to download 25 songs in less than a second. If you need more perspective, imagine downloading a high definition movie in less than 36 seconds. Of course, those are examples based on theoretical maximums, and actual speeds depend on a variety of factors, including how fast a source can serve up a download. Still, 1Gbps is Internet... Read more...
Charter Communications this week said it's planning to acquire Bright House Networks, the sixth largest cable company in the U.S., for $10.4 billion. However, there are several contingencies, one of the biggest of which is government approval for rival Comcast to acquire Time Warner Cable, as Charter has a vested interest in the side deal. If Comcast is able to buy TWC, it has agreed to shed 1.4 million subscribers to Charter in exchange for $7.3 billion to help nudge regulators to approve the deal. Comcast said it would also divest 2.5 million subscribers as part of a spinoff into a... Read more...
Google and AT&T have been slowly rolling 1Gbps fiber Internet services across the United States. Google struck the first blow when it launched Google Fiber in Kansas City, Kansas, and AT&T has followed suit as Google Fiber’s shadow in many markets (and in markets where Google is not already available, AT&T has seen fit to price gouge customers). Now, both AT&T and Google are about to get some competition from Comcast, which is set to launch an even faster fiber-based service this year starting in Atlanta, Georgia. Starting next month, 1.5 million Atlanta metro area residents will... Read more...
As someone who can't imagine not owning a powerful desktop PC with a big monitor, Pew Research Center's latest Internet usage report short-circuits my brain just a little bit. The biggest takeaway from the results is that nearly 20% of Americans access the Internet primarily on their mobile phones. That means they don't use a desktop or notebook for Internet access - only their phone. Perhaps for the younger generation, this shouldn't come as too much of a surprise, but even so, 20% is a huge share. Other results show that 64% of American adults own a smartphone, and close to 25% of them have limited... Read more...
When the cat's away, the mouse will play, or charge more for his services, as the case may be. Or to be more specific, AT&T is launching its fiber Internet service in parts of Cupertino, California, home of Apple, but is charging more for 1Gbps speeds than it does in other areas where U-verse with GigaPower is offered. In Kansas City and Austin, AT&T's U-verse with GigaPower costs $70 per month for gigabit service when opting in to its "Internet Preferences" program, which gives the company permission to view your web traffic. In exchange, AT&T matches Google's competing fiber Internet... Read more...
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