Items tagged with Internet

If you want faster Internet service, you should move to Washington, D.C. Or stay right where you are and wait for things to get better, as they have been. According to the latest State of the Internet Report by Akamai Technologies, a content delivery network (CDN) player, the average Internet connection speed around the globe hiked up 14 percent compared to a year ago. "The continued increase in average connection speeds is a reassuring trend as online retailers prepare for the busy holiday shopping season," said David Belson, editor of Akamai’s State of the Internet Report. "However, recent Internet... Read more...
In early August, we reported that 6th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals ruled the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) had no authority to prevent states from imposing restrictions on municipal internet. This was a result of the FCC stepping in last year in an effort to use its authority to “remove barriers to broadband investment and competition”. However, the courts sided with the states, which said that the FCC’s order impeded on state rights. In the end, this ruling was not a win for the consumers, but clearly favored firmly entrenched big brand operators like Time Warner Cable, Comcast, and... Read more...
The European Commission is doing its best Oprah Winfrey impression, though instead of giving away cars, it's focusing on Wi-Fi access to the public sector—you get free Wi-Fi, and you get free Wi-Fi, and you get free Wi-Fi! It's a €120 million (~$135 million in U.S. currency) effort to bring free Wi-Fi to all facets of public life by the year 2020. Governments can apply for funding to participate in the WiFi4EU project to install Wi-Fi networks in public places, such as libraries and parks. When all is said and done, the EU estimates that anywhere from 6,000 on up to 8,000 public locations will... Read more...
Congratulations people of Chicago, Comcast just expanded the availability of its 1-gigabit broadband Internet service to your area. That sounds like reason for celebration, right? It should be except that compared to same service in Atlanta and Nashville, it costs twice as much for the speedy Internet connection. In Atlanta and Georgia, Comcast offered new customers willing to commit to three years of service a rate of $70 per month. Those who wanted no part of a long-term contract could pay $140 per month, which is what Comcast is charging for its 1Gbps service in Chicago. Unfortunately, Comcast... Read more...
A filing with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) reveals just how adamant Google is about building out a wireless version Fiber, its high-speed Internet service that offers up to 1Gbps upload and download speeds in select locations across the United States. The wireless transmission technology is already being tested in Kansas City, which is one of the locations where Fiber service is offered, and Google wants permission to expand.According to the redacted FCC filing, Google wants to use "experimental transmitters" in around two dozen locations, including several cities in California and... Read more...
The Federal Communications Commission led by chairman Tom Wheeler suffered a setback today in its plan to encourage and allow cities to build and expand their own broadband networks, as a federal appeals court ruled the agency didn't have the authority to block two states from setting limits on municipal broadband expansion. Municipalities in Chattanooga, Tennessee and Wilson, North Carolina wanted to expand their broadband networks to neighboring communities and counties, which would increase competition with private Internet Service Providers (ISPs) that have regional monopolies. However, there... Read more...
Everyone has birthdays and anniversaries, but not everyone considers them to be that significant. However, an occasion that is hard to argue as being anything but notable is the anniversary of the first webpage going live on the World Wide Web (remember when we used to call it that?). This weekend marks the 25th year for the first publicly-accessible webpage. To say we've come a long way since that day on August 6th, 1991 would be an incredible understatement. By the mid-90s, many school computer labs began to gain internet access, and at around the same time, or not long after, home users began... Read more...
In the broadband-testing world, Ookla's Speedtest dominates with copious amounts of useful data being compiled every day. According to its latest US broadband report, the company says that there are a staggering 8 million tests conducted worldwide each and every day. Those numbers mean one thing: we can get a very accurate picture on what broadband speeds are like across the globe. Speedtest has produced such reports in the past, and ultimately it has never painted the prettiest pictures for US broadband performance. Even with this latest report, the country's broadband landscape has been... Read more...
Usually when there's an announcement about data caps, it's bad news for subscribers. Refreshingly, that isn't the case with AT&T, which is raising the ceiling on the amount of data its U-verse customers are able to use. It's a welcome acknowledgement that the Internet is growing and that, collectively, users are spending more time streaming, downloading, and even uploading content.AT&T says as much in its blog post announcing the change, and for that it deserves some amount of kudos. How much kudos? That depends on how happy you are with raising the monthly allowance of data to 1 terabyte... Read more...
With all of the online services it offers, Google obviously has a vested interest in connecting people to the Internet and promoting high-speed connections. It's part of the reason why Google is pushing its Google Fiber service across the country, and it's why the sultan of search teamed with five other firms to invest $300 million in FASTER, an undersea cable system that transfers data between the West Coast and Japan with a mind-boggling 60 terabits per second of bandwidth. FASTER was constructed with the latest high-quality six-fiber-pair cable and 100 gigabits per second x 100 wavelengths optical... Read more...
Google's been on a mission to offer 1Gbps Internet service to as many people as possible through its Googe Fiber service, and to accelerate future roll outs, it has agreed to acquire Webpass, a high-speed ISP serving San Francisco, Oakland, Emeryville, Berkeley, San Diego, Miami, Miami Beach, Coral Gables, Chicago, and Boston. Like Google Fiber, Webpass offers download and upload speeds of to 1Gbps. It's also a much smaller operation than major ISPs such as Charter Spectrum and Cox Communications. That makes it an ideal target for Google, which doesn't always build fiber optic networks from the... Read more...
Today's wireless networks can handle applications like Snapchat, but what about the emergence of virtual reality? FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler said his eyes were opened to the need for significantly faster wireless signals when he donned a pair of VR goggles in Washington, DC, and controlled an excavator to dig up dirt 1,400 miles away in Texas. "Granted, remotely digging dirt in Dallas probably isn't high on the list of transformational advancements that will define the 21st century. But what if you replace the heavy machinery with a scalpel so a world-class surgeon can move from hospital to hospital... Read more...
FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler and the rest of the gang were all smiles on Tuesday when a federal appeals court completely upheld the agency's 400-page Open Internet Order, a set of net neutrality rules that wireless carriers and broadband service providers must abide by. The FCC emerged the victor as a result of a 2-1 ruling in its favor. The ruling reinforces the FCC's authority and power to regulate broadband Internet service as a utility, similar to phone service, and to lay out rules to prevent what it deems are unfair practices for consumers. One of the biggest net neutrality rules is that ISPs... Read more...
The rise of the Internet has forever changed the way we go about our daily lives and made certain things more convenient, but the more online services a person uses, the higher the potential privacy cost. That's been a rising deterrent for Americans, many of which now avoid certain online activities over concerns about privacy and security, according to a recent study by the National Telecommunications & Information Administration. NTIA combed over survey data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau, which included answers to several privacy and security questions by more than 41,000 households... Read more...
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